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    “I am not sure if it is because there were less people on the streets or that we started paying more attention from our windows. It was a collective feeling. My brother who lives in Germany messaged me in a rush. He asked me to listen to the unusual sounds of birds in the early hours of the day. He said it was a sign. Neither of us fathomed what it meant.” March - September 2020.⁣
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From ‘When Birds Sang Again’ by Mahmoud Khattab (@somewhereincairo).⁣
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“‘When Birds Sang Again’ is both public and personal. I have seen and documented the emptiness of streets in my city during the COVID-19 pandemic and the personal reflection that came with it. I saw my beloved wary city in lockdown, taking refuge in my home, looking out my window. I kept the same distance from strangers and friends; anyone who doesn’t live and eat with me, including my uncle Mustafa who taught me everything about Mathematics, and Eslam and whose hugs comforted me.” ⁣
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Mahmoud Khattab is a photographer based in Cairo, Egypt, and an African Photojournalism Database member (APJD). He was inspired to pursue photography during the Arab Spring that took to the Egyptian streets in 2011. He is an @everydayafrica and @everydaymiddleeast contributor.⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    “I am not sure if it is because there were less people on the streets or that we started paying more attention from our windows. It was a collective feeling. My brother who lives in Germany messaged me in a rush. He asked me to listen to the unusual sounds of birds in the early hours of the day. He said it was a sign. Neither of us fathomed what it meant.” March - September 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘When Birds Sang Again’ by Mahmoud Khattab (@somewhereincairo).⁣ ⁣ “‘When Birds Sang Again’ is both public and personal. I have seen and documented the emptiness of streets in my city during the COVID-19 pandemic and the personal reflection that came with it. I saw my beloved wary city in lockdown, taking refuge in my home, looking out my window. I kept the same distance from strangers and friends; anyone who doesn’t live and eat with me, including my uncle Mustafa who taught me everything about Mathematics, and Eslam and whose hugs comforted me.” ⁣ ⁣ Mahmoud Khattab is a photographer based in Cairo, Egypt, and an African Photojournalism Database member (APJD). He was inspired to pursue photography during the Arab Spring that took to the Egyptian streets in 2011. He is an @everydayafrica and @everydaymiddleeast contributor.⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Two young boys pose together during a peaceful demonstration in the streets of Bukavu, South Kivu province, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, on 1 October 2020. The march was organized by civil society organizations to call for the establishment of a special tribunal to trial the perpetrators of the serious crimes committed in the Democratic Republic of Congo between March 1993 and June 2003. They are part of the association 'Mitamba za Balega' which provides support to victims and children born of rape and sexual violence against women.⁣
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Esther N'sapu (@esther_nsapu) is a journalist and photographer based in the Democratic Republic of Congo and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (#APJD). She is interested in documenting her region in a different way, “not as a land of conflict but rather a land where there is love and hope.”⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Two young boys pose together during a peaceful demonstration in the streets of Bukavu, South Kivu province, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, on 1 October 2020. The march was organized by civil society organizations to call for the establishment of a special tribunal to trial the perpetrators of the serious crimes committed in the Democratic Republic of Congo between March 1993 and June 2003. They are part of the association 'Mitamba za Balega' which provides support to victims and children born of rape and sexual violence against women.⁣ ⁣ Esther N'sapu (@esther_nsapu) is a journalist and photographer based in the Democratic Republic of Congo and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (#APJD). She is interested in documenting her region in a different way, “not as a land of conflict but rather a land where there is love and hope.”⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    "My name is Etagegn Tessema. I was born in Lasta, Wollo, Ethiopia. I am 50 years old, married and a mother of one. To support my husband and my son, I’d walk from Gabriel where I live all the way to Ayat and work as a day laborer. I have been doing this for 12 years. I’ve been working as a janitor at the Eka Kotebe hospital in Addis Ababa for the past year. When the pandemic started, I was the only one supporting my family so I did not hesitate to continue working. I’d go back home after work and my neighbors and friends wouldn’t face me. But I didn’t have a choice but to keep my job. I ask for God to say this is enough so my neighbors and I could go back to our old friendship." March 2020⁣
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From ‘Finding Meaning in a Pandemic’ by Yonas Tadesse (@yonas_tadesse_), focusing on the taskforce at the Eka Kotebe hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.⁣
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The first case of COVID-19 in Ethiopia was reported on 13 March, when a team of first responders took in a 48-year-old Japanese man. Having never seen anything like his condition, they did not know what to prepare for, and thus started their fight against coronavirus in Ethiopia. Doctors, nurses, janitors, security guards and drivers donned hats they had never imagined wearing as they worked to develop systems and techniques to minimize the damage of the virus – often at the cost of their health, their home lives, their reputations, and sometimes their lives.⁣
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Yonas Tadesse is a self-taught Ethiopian photographer based in Addis Ababa, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (#APJD). His work focuses on changing the narrative of Africa and showcasing its rich history to the world. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, he has documented doctors and emergency workers at the frontline of the fight against the virus.
    "My name is Etagegn Tessema. I was born in Lasta, Wollo, Ethiopia. I am 50 years old, married and a mother of one. To support my husband and my son, I’d walk from Gabriel where I live all the way to Ayat and work as a day laborer. I have been doing this for 12 years. I’ve been working as a janitor at the Eka Kotebe hospital in Addis Ababa for the past year. When the pandemic started, I was the only one supporting my family so I did not hesitate to continue working. I’d go back home after work and my neighbors and friends wouldn’t face me. But I didn’t have a choice but to keep my job. I ask for God to say this is enough so my neighbors and I could go back to our old friendship." March 2020⁣ ⁣ From ‘Finding Meaning in a Pandemic’ by Yonas Tadesse (@yonas_tadesse_), focusing on the taskforce at the Eka Kotebe hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.⁣ ⁣ The first case of COVID-19 in Ethiopia was reported on 13 March, when a team of first responders took in a 48-year-old Japanese man. Having never seen anything like his condition, they did not know what to prepare for, and thus started their fight against coronavirus in Ethiopia. Doctors, nurses, janitors, security guards and drivers donned hats they had never imagined wearing as they worked to develop systems and techniques to minimize the damage of the virus – often at the cost of their health, their home lives, their reputations, and sometimes their lives.⁣ ⁣ Yonas Tadesse is a self-taught Ethiopian photographer based in Addis Ababa, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (#APJD). His work focuses on changing the narrative of Africa and showcasing its rich history to the world. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, he has documented doctors and emergency workers at the frontline of the fight against the virus.
    Adel and Mohammed put their pajamas on under LED light during a blackout in Tripoli, Libya, on 17 July 2020.⁣⁣⁣
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From ‘Power Cuts in Libya’ by Nada Harib (@nada_harib).⁣ Shot on assignment for Getty Images (@gettyimages).⁣⁣
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The western region of Libya, especially Tripoli, witnesses long power cuts that sometimes exceed twenty hours. As the capital turns into a dark room penetrated by the noise of generators, there seems to be no improvement in the management of the electricity company, whether by maintaining the existing station or by proposing alternative solutions for renewable energies. Recently, people have been protesting, calling the government to provide at least basic services.⁣⁣⁣
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Nada Harib is a freelance documentary photographer raised and based in Tripoli, Libya, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). Her work focuses on chronicling people’s daily lives while traveling in her home country and abroad.⁣⁣⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Adel and Mohammed put their pajamas on under LED light during a blackout in Tripoli, Libya, on 17 July 2020.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ From ‘Power Cuts in Libya’ by Nada Harib (@nada_harib).⁣ Shot on assignment for Getty Images (@gettyimages).⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ The western region of Libya, especially Tripoli, witnesses long power cuts that sometimes exceed twenty hours. As the capital turns into a dark room penetrated by the noise of generators, there seems to be no improvement in the management of the electricity company, whether by maintaining the existing station or by proposing alternative solutions for renewable energies. Recently, people have been protesting, calling the government to provide at least basic services.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Nada Harib is a freelance documentary photographer raised and based in Tripoli, Libya, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). Her work focuses on chronicling people’s daily lives while traveling in her home country and abroad.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Jimmy Lemara, manager of Porini Mara (@porinicamps) in Ol Kinyei Conservancy, Kenya. 29 September 2020.⁣
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From ‘Ol Kinyei Conservancy: The Future of Sustainable Wildlife Tourism in Kenya’ by Khadija Farah (@farahkhad).⁣
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The Ol Kinyei Conservancy in Kenya is home to two small safari camps, the Porini Mara Camp and the Porini Cheetah Camp, each of which has six tents accommodating a total of maximum 24 guests. The land part of Ol Kinyei Conservancy belongs to the Maasai community who set it aside for wildlife conservation. The land is leased by them and they are paid directly every month for its use. The camps also employ the local community so they are involved in the management of the conservancy.⁣
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“I strongly believe that this conservancy is a great model for the future of sustainable wildlife tourism in Kenya. Having people from local communities directly benefiting from the use of their ancestral lands for conservation and tourism shouldn’t be revolutionary in this country but it is." - Khadija Farah.⁣
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Khadija Farah is a travel and documentary photographer from Nairobi, Kenya, and an African Photojournalism Database member (APJD). From conservation to women's issues, she is passionate about stories which provide a 'light bulb moment' or challenge public discourses on a subject.⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Jimmy Lemara, manager of Porini Mara (@porinicamps) in Ol Kinyei Conservancy, Kenya. 29 September 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘Ol Kinyei Conservancy: The Future of Sustainable Wildlife Tourism in Kenya’ by Khadija Farah (@farahkhad).⁣ ⁣ The Ol Kinyei Conservancy in Kenya is home to two small safari camps, the Porini Mara Camp and the Porini Cheetah Camp, each of which has six tents accommodating a total of maximum 24 guests. The land part of Ol Kinyei Conservancy belongs to the Maasai community who set it aside for wildlife conservation. The land is leased by them and they are paid directly every month for its use. The camps also employ the local community so they are involved in the management of the conservancy.⁣ ⁣ “I strongly believe that this conservancy is a great model for the future of sustainable wildlife tourism in Kenya. Having people from local communities directly benefiting from the use of their ancestral lands for conservation and tourism shouldn’t be revolutionary in this country but it is." - Khadija Farah.⁣ ⁣ Khadija Farah is a travel and documentary photographer from Nairobi, Kenya, and an African Photojournalism Database member (APJD). From conservation to women's issues, she is passionate about stories which provide a 'light bulb moment' or challenge public discourses on a subject.⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    1. “My father is a big fan of Egyptian music from the 50s to the 80s. During the lockdown and until today, music has been and still is his escape. It gives him a sense of hope for better times. When he is not at work he spends his time consulting his music books, writing, and playing the oud-lute which accompanies him and cheers him up.” March 2020.⁣
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2. “At the beginning of the confinement, my mother was concerned that we were running out of food. She filled the cupboards, freezer and fridge with food. She spent a lot of her time in the kitchen kneading bread and preparing food. I felt like the same day was repeating itself over and over again for her." April 2020.⁣
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3. Sheets and a pillow in the living room where my father was lying, and cloth masks on the table. May 2020.⁣
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From ‘Fiction of Reality’ by M'hammed Kilito (@mhammed_kilito),⁣
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'Fiction of Reality' is a documentary photo project made during the first 3 months of lockdown in Morocco. It focuses on the home as defined by social distancing regulations. Through photographs of his parents in their homestead, Kilito seeks to humanize the crisis. "I usually don't photograph my parents because they are a little shy, but during the days spent together they let me take pictures. I could not take photographs for my ongoing projects anymore and my exhibitions and artist residencies had been cancelled or postponed." M'hammed Kilito.⁣
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This project was funded by National Geographic Society.⁣
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M'hammed Kilito is an independent photographer based in Rabat, Morocco, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (#APJD). As a documentary photographer, he addresses issues relating to cultural identity and the human condition.⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    1. “My father is a big fan of Egyptian music from the 50s to the 80s. During the lockdown and until today, music has been and still is his escape. It gives him a sense of hope for better times. When he is not at work he spends his time consulting his music books, writing, and playing the oud-lute which accompanies him and cheers him up.” March 2020.⁣ ⁣ 2. “At the beginning of the confinement, my mother was concerned that we were running out of food. She filled the cupboards, freezer and fridge with food. She spent a lot of her time in the kitchen kneading bread and preparing food. I felt like the same day was repeating itself over and over again for her." April 2020.⁣ ⁣ 3. Sheets and a pillow in the living room where my father was lying, and cloth masks on the table. May 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘Fiction of Reality’ by M'hammed Kilito (@mhammed_kilito),⁣ ⁣ 'Fiction of Reality' is a documentary photo project made during the first 3 months of lockdown in Morocco. It focuses on the home as defined by social distancing regulations. Through photographs of his parents in their homestead, Kilito seeks to humanize the crisis. "I usually don't photograph my parents because they are a little shy, but during the days spent together they let me take pictures. I could not take photographs for my ongoing projects anymore and my exhibitions and artist residencies had been cancelled or postponed." M'hammed Kilito.⁣ ⁣ This project was funded by National Geographic Society.⁣ ⁣ M'hammed Kilito is an independent photographer based in Rabat, Morocco, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (#APJD). As a documentary photographer, he addresses issues relating to cultural identity and the human condition.⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Lij Alem (76) after returning home & reuniting with his family.⁣
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“One day I was tired of sitting at home, so I decided to go visit a few of the parks that had recently opened. When I got home later that day, I started having some irritation in my throat, but didn’t make a big deal out of it. After 3 days, I started to cough heavily. My daughter took me to a local clinic & the diagnosis was a simple allergy. As we were driving back, I started having difficulty breathing, which forced us to go to another hospital. I was then diagnosed with COVID-19. My daughter & the rest of my family tested negative. When I heard that I was being transferred to Millennium Hall, it made me sad & I cried. I thought that that was my last day. I was oxygenated upon arrival at the center. For every minute of the next 9 days, I only had one recurring thought: “Please God, I don’t want to die like this. I want to see my family. I want a second chance." I couldn’t get a night of proper sleep or any rest. All I could think of was life and death. It made me appreciate what I had been given in life.⁣
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Those 9 days were the most stressful moments of my life. Lying in bed, I counted 12 deaths one after the other of patients who were around the same age as me. After those days, I saw a glimpse of light when the medical team informed me that I was doing well & was going to be transferred to another section. I cried for hours with gratitude. After concluding my quarantine & getting the tests done, I called my daughter & told her to come to pick me up the next morning. I think I saw death but God gave me a second chance." Lij Alem, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 7 September 2020.⁣
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From ‘Heroes of the Ghost War’ by Amanuel Sileshi (@amanuel_sileshi), a project that sheds light on the medical teams fighting the COVID-19 pandemic around the clock, and on the stories of COVID-19 patients and survivors.⁣
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Amanuel Sileshi is photojournalist based in Ethiopia currently working for @afpphoto, & a member of the Africa Photojournalism Database (APJD). He is interested in documenting the change & the effects that conflict, political reforms & the evolution of governance have on humanity.
    Lij Alem (76) after returning home & reuniting with his family.⁣ ⁣ “One day I was tired of sitting at home, so I decided to go visit a few of the parks that had recently opened. When I got home later that day, I started having some irritation in my throat, but didn’t make a big deal out of it. After 3 days, I started to cough heavily. My daughter took me to a local clinic & the diagnosis was a simple allergy. As we were driving back, I started having difficulty breathing, which forced us to go to another hospital. I was then diagnosed with COVID-19. My daughter & the rest of my family tested negative. When I heard that I was being transferred to Millennium Hall, it made me sad & I cried. I thought that that was my last day. I was oxygenated upon arrival at the center. For every minute of the next 9 days, I only had one recurring thought: “Please God, I don’t want to die like this. I want to see my family. I want a second chance." I couldn’t get a night of proper sleep or any rest. All I could think of was life and death. It made me appreciate what I had been given in life.⁣ ⁣ Those 9 days were the most stressful moments of my life. Lying in bed, I counted 12 deaths one after the other of patients who were around the same age as me. After those days, I saw a glimpse of light when the medical team informed me that I was doing well & was going to be transferred to another section. I cried for hours with gratitude. After concluding my quarantine & getting the tests done, I called my daughter & told her to come to pick me up the next morning. I think I saw death but God gave me a second chance." Lij Alem, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 7 September 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘Heroes of the Ghost War’ by Amanuel Sileshi (@amanuel_sileshi), a project that sheds light on the medical teams fighting the COVID-19 pandemic around the clock, and on the stories of COVID-19 patients and survivors.⁣ ⁣ Amanuel Sileshi is photojournalist based in Ethiopia currently working for @afpphoto, & a member of the Africa Photojournalism Database (APJD). He is interested in documenting the change & the effects that conflict, political reforms & the evolution of governance have on humanity.
    1. Victoria and Tim Abaa prepare vegetable parcels, which will be distributed later the same day to residents of the informal settlements of Esi Lahliwe in the south of Johannesburg, as part of the Ubuntu Project. The Ubuntu Project is an initiative that has provided parcels of organic vegetables, as well as gardening starter kits and seedlings to hundreds of vulnerable households in the townships since the beginning of lockdown. Abaa is co-founder of the Ubuntu Project. Johannesburg, South Africa, September 2020.⁣
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2. Siyabonga Ndlangamandla, coordinator of the Makers Valley Growing Community, maintains one of the food gardens he has set up in the area. Makers Valley is an inner-city neighborhood in Johannesburg, home to about 46,000 people. The edible gardens initiative lets residents grow food at home and on curbsides to contribute towards long-term food security in the area, 30 September 2020.⁣
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From ‘How COVID-19 Sowed the Seeds of Food Security in Johannesburg’ by Miora Rajaonary (@miorarajaonary).⁣
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During South Africa’s strict lockdown, groups of activists decided to distribute vegetable parcels as well as seedlings and gardening materials to hundreds of vulnerable households. Forced to follow the lockdown regulations, millions of financially strapped citizens across the country continued to struggle with access to food relief. As various systems that had been put in place by the government to ensure fair distribution to qualifying households, groups of activists took it upon themselves to help their community. Community-ran initiatives distributed food parcels with a focus on establishing resilient food systems, challenging precarious government action.⁣
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Miora Rajaonary is an independent documentary photographer from Madagascar. She is a @EverydayAfrica contributor and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD), whose work focuses on social issues and the question of identity in contemporary Africa.
    1. Victoria and Tim Abaa prepare vegetable parcels, which will be distributed later the same day to residents of the informal settlements of Esi Lahliwe in the south of Johannesburg, as part of the Ubuntu Project. The Ubuntu Project is an initiative that has provided parcels of organic vegetables, as well as gardening starter kits and seedlings to hundreds of vulnerable households in the townships since the beginning of lockdown. Abaa is co-founder of the Ubuntu Project. Johannesburg, South Africa, September 2020.⁣ ⁣ 2. Siyabonga Ndlangamandla, coordinator of the Makers Valley Growing Community, maintains one of the food gardens he has set up in the area. Makers Valley is an inner-city neighborhood in Johannesburg, home to about 46,000 people. The edible gardens initiative lets residents grow food at home and on curbsides to contribute towards long-term food security in the area, 30 September 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘How COVID-19 Sowed the Seeds of Food Security in Johannesburg’ by Miora Rajaonary (@miorarajaonary).⁣ ⁣ During South Africa’s strict lockdown, groups of activists decided to distribute vegetable parcels as well as seedlings and gardening materials to hundreds of vulnerable households. Forced to follow the lockdown regulations, millions of financially strapped citizens across the country continued to struggle with access to food relief. As various systems that had been put in place by the government to ensure fair distribution to qualifying households, groups of activists took it upon themselves to help their community. Community-ran initiatives distributed food parcels with a focus on establishing resilient food systems, challenging precarious government action.⁣ ⁣ Miora Rajaonary is an independent documentary photographer from Madagascar. She is a @EverydayAfrica contributor and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD), whose work focuses on social issues and the question of identity in contemporary Africa.
    1. People protest against police brutality in Mathare, Nairobi, Kenya, on 16 June 2020.⁣
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2. Protesters march in Mathare during a peaceful protest organized by the Mathare Social Justice Center, on 16 June 2020.⁣
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3. Photojournalist, politician and activist Boniface Mwangi during the Saba Saba Day protests in Nairobi's Central Business District, on 7 July 2020. Boniface Mwangi played a key role in organizing peaceful protests against social injustices in Kenya.⁣
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4. Protesters march in Nairobi's Central Business District during a peaceful march on Saba Saba Day, 7 July 2020.⁣
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From ‘Saba Saba’ by Gordwin Odhiambo (@gordwin_docu_photo).⁣
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On 7 July 2020, the 30th anniversary of the Saba Saba, Kenyan citizens took to the streets in protests against the rise of extrajudicial killings in Nairobi's informal settlements during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to The Independent Policing Oversight Body, 15 people have been killed⁣
by the police since the country imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew on 27 March to combat the spread of COVID-19. The protesters demanded an end to police brutality and killings, advocated for a favorable legal and policy environment in Kenya, good housing, and an end to power abuse. Many policemen were deployed in Nairobi city center and in the areas where the protests took place in Mathare, Dandora, and Kiamaiko. Teargas was thrown and several people were arrested during the march.⁣
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Gordwin Odhiambo is a documentary photographer born and raised in Nairobi, Kenya, & a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). His photography explores social & cultural issues, academic barriers, & nuances of stereotypes. His current works explore the dynamics of youths from low-income urban communities in Nairobi.⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging & professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation & @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy & help international media better understand the issues & projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    1. People protest against police brutality in Mathare, Nairobi, Kenya, on 16 June 2020.⁣ ⁣ 2. Protesters march in Mathare during a peaceful protest organized by the Mathare Social Justice Center, on 16 June 2020.⁣ ⁣ 3. Photojournalist, politician and activist Boniface Mwangi during the Saba Saba Day protests in Nairobi's Central Business District, on 7 July 2020. Boniface Mwangi played a key role in organizing peaceful protests against social injustices in Kenya.⁣ ⁣ 4. Protesters march in Nairobi's Central Business District during a peaceful march on Saba Saba Day, 7 July 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘Saba Saba’ by Gordwin Odhiambo (@gordwin_docu_photo).⁣ ⁣ On 7 July 2020, the 30th anniversary of the Saba Saba, Kenyan citizens took to the streets in protests against the rise of extrajudicial killings in Nairobi's informal settlements during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to The Independent Policing Oversight Body, 15 people have been killed⁣ by the police since the country imposed a dusk-to-dawn curfew on 27 March to combat the spread of COVID-19. The protesters demanded an end to police brutality and killings, advocated for a favorable legal and policy environment in Kenya, good housing, and an end to power abuse. Many policemen were deployed in Nairobi city center and in the areas where the protests took place in Mathare, Dandora, and Kiamaiko. Teargas was thrown and several people were arrested during the march.⁣ ⁣ Gordwin Odhiambo is a documentary photographer born and raised in Nairobi, Kenya, & a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). His photography explores social & cultural issues, academic barriers, & nuances of stereotypes. His current works explore the dynamics of youths from low-income urban communities in Nairobi.⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging & professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation & @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy & help international media better understand the issues & projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Sandra Chikore leaves her home at 5:45am, walking close to 2 kilometres before getting in the back of a shared pick-up truck. “I leave the house while it is still dark and walk along the main road, flagging private cars. My mother asked me if I was not afraid for my life. I am, but I have no choice. When coming back from work, I have to wait for the bus and sometimes I get home around 8pm. I am just tired and want to take a bath, eat and sleep, I do not have much time to spend with my son any more.” Harare, Zimbabwe, 30 June 2020.⁣
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From ‘My Day Starts at 3am: Coronavirus Fuels Gruelling Harare Commutes’ by Cynthia Matonhodze (@cynthiamatonhodze).⁣
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Between March and May 2020, lockdown measures meant getting to work is fraught with risk for those manning essential services in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital. Matonhodze documented frontline staff as they cope with erratic buses, exhaustion and danger.⁣
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Cynthia Matonhodze is an independent documentary photographer, photojournalist and videographer currently based in Harare, Zimbabwe, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). Since beginning photographing in 2012, she has focused on social issues, mostly in her native country, Zimbabwe. She is a contributor to Everyday Africa (@everydayafrica) and Everyday Zimbabwe (@everydayzimbabwe).⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Sandra Chikore leaves her home at 5:45am, walking close to 2 kilometres before getting in the back of a shared pick-up truck. “I leave the house while it is still dark and walk along the main road, flagging private cars. My mother asked me if I was not afraid for my life. I am, but I have no choice. When coming back from work, I have to wait for the bus and sometimes I get home around 8pm. I am just tired and want to take a bath, eat and sleep, I do not have much time to spend with my son any more.” Harare, Zimbabwe, 30 June 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘My Day Starts at 3am: Coronavirus Fuels Gruelling Harare Commutes’ by Cynthia Matonhodze (@cynthiamatonhodze).⁣ ⁣ Between March and May 2020, lockdown measures meant getting to work is fraught with risk for those manning essential services in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital. Matonhodze documented frontline staff as they cope with erratic buses, exhaustion and danger.⁣ ⁣ Cynthia Matonhodze is an independent documentary photographer, photojournalist and videographer currently based in Harare, Zimbabwe, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). Since beginning photographing in 2012, she has focused on social issues, mostly in her native country, Zimbabwe. She is a contributor to Everyday Africa (@everydayafrica) and Everyday Zimbabwe (@everydayzimbabwe).⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    1. The Queen of Koubanou during the celebration of Eid, also known as Tabaski and Korité in Senegal. Dakar, Senegal, July 2020.⁣
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2. Mame Gnagna during the celebration of Eid in Dakar, Senegal, July 2020.⁣
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3. Welli, during the celebration of Eid in Dakar, July 2020.⁣
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4. Little Gnagna during the celebration of Eid in Dakar, July 2020.⁣
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From ‘Ndewendeul, Tabaski 2020’ by Djibril Drame (@gadaay).⁣
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Djibril Drame has been capturing portraits on the occasion of the feast of Eid, also known as Tabaski and Korité in Senegal, as a tradition in his work. His series ‘Ndewendeul, Tabaski 2020’ aims to reveal the people's profound unity through the main Islamic religious holidays as experienced in Senegal. These feasts are an occasion for young and old, men and women to wear flamboyant clothes, to feast and to visit each other. Drame seeks to illustrate the meaning of the celebration for the Senegalese, as well as illustrate the secular dimension of it.⁣
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Djibril Drame is a Senegalese visual artist and journalist based in Dakar, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). His purpose is to showcase the beauty of Africa and change the image of Africa by sharing his own imagery of the continent.⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    1. The Queen of Koubanou during the celebration of Eid, also known as Tabaski and Korité in Senegal. Dakar, Senegal, July 2020.⁣ ⁣ 2. Mame Gnagna during the celebration of Eid in Dakar, Senegal, July 2020.⁣ ⁣ 3. Welli, during the celebration of Eid in Dakar, July 2020.⁣ ⁣ 4. Little Gnagna during the celebration of Eid in Dakar, July 2020.⁣ ⁣ From ‘Ndewendeul, Tabaski 2020’ by Djibril Drame (@gadaay).⁣ ⁣ Djibril Drame has been capturing portraits on the occasion of the feast of Eid, also known as Tabaski and Korité in Senegal, as a tradition in his work. His series ‘Ndewendeul, Tabaski 2020’ aims to reveal the people's profound unity through the main Islamic religious holidays as experienced in Senegal. These feasts are an occasion for young and old, men and women to wear flamboyant clothes, to feast and to visit each other. Drame seeks to illustrate the meaning of the celebration for the Senegalese, as well as illustrate the secular dimension of it.⁣ ⁣ Djibril Drame is a Senegalese visual artist and journalist based in Dakar, and a member of the African Photojournalism Database (APJD). His purpose is to showcase the beauty of Africa and change the image of Africa by sharing his own imagery of the continent.⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Protests against the Special Anti-Robbery Squad in Lagos, Nigeria, on 10 October 2020. Nigerians are demanding an end to a rogue police unit, the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) and to police brutality, extortion and killings of innocent Nigerians. The #EndSARS protests have become a top trend on social media as well as offline. The Nigerian government has been heavily criticized for the silence as protesters are unrelenting.⁣
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From ‘#EndSARS protests’ by Grace Ekpu (@graceekpu).⁣
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Years of unfettered violence from the Nigerian Police Force, and particularly from members of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), have traumatized the Nigerian people. Things finally reached a tipping point when pent-up anger erupted from the country’s dominant youth population as they went to protest in the streets.⁣
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Grace Epku is a documentary photographer living and working in Lagos, Nigeria and an African Photojournalism Database (APJD) member. As a passionate visual storyteller, she is constantly seeking various avenues to tell the African story from the African perspective.⁣
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The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
    Protests against the Special Anti-Robbery Squad in Lagos, Nigeria, on 10 October 2020. Nigerians are demanding an end to a rogue police unit, the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) and to police brutality, extortion and killings of innocent Nigerians. The #EndSARS protests have become a top trend on social media as well as offline. The Nigerian government has been heavily criticized for the silence as protesters are unrelenting.⁣ ⁣ From ‘#EndSARS protests’ by Grace Ekpu (@graceekpu).⁣ ⁣ Years of unfettered violence from the Nigerian Police Force, and particularly from members of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), have traumatized the Nigerian people. Things finally reached a tipping point when pent-up anger erupted from the country’s dominant youth population as they went to protest in the streets.⁣ ⁣ Grace Epku is a documentary photographer living and working in Lagos, Nigeria and an African Photojournalism Database (APJD) member. As a passionate visual storyteller, she is constantly seeking various avenues to tell the African story from the African perspective.⁣ ⁣ The APJD is a directory of +500 emerging and professional African visual journalists. A joint project of the World Press Photo Foundation and @EverydayAfrica, the APJD aims to connect African visual journalists to the international media economy and help international media better understand the issues and projects that African visual journalists consider important. Follow the link in the bio to learn more.
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