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    The New York Times has obtained tax-return data for President Trump and his companies that covers more than two decades. Trump has long refused to release this information, making him the first president in decades to hide basic details about his finances. His refusal has made his tax returns among the most sought-after documents in recent memory.

Tap the link in our bio for 18 key findings from our investigation.
    The New York Times has obtained tax-return data for President Trump and his companies that covers more than two decades. Trump has long refused to release this information, making him the first president in decades to hide basic details about his finances. His refusal has made his tax returns among the most sought-after documents in recent memory. Tap the link in our bio for 18 key findings from our investigation.
    The New York Times has obtained tax-return data for President Trump extending over more than two decades. It shows his finances under stress, beset by losses that he aggressively employs to avoid paying taxes, and hundreds of millions in debt coming due. Tap the link in our bio to read the exclusive report.
    The New York Times has obtained tax-return data for President Trump extending over more than two decades. It shows his finances under stress, beset by losses that he aggressively employs to avoid paying taxes, and hundreds of millions in debt coming due. Tap the link in our bio to read the exclusive report.
    Baseball fans have found ways to watch live baseball in person this season despite not being allowed in the stands.
 
The coronavirus pandemic chopped baseball’s season from 162 games per team and 68 million tickets sold to 60 games per team with zero tickets sold. But in many cities, enterprising fans have found vantage points to sneak a free look.
 
In some cities, like Chicago and Los Angeles, this has been possible for decades, with nearby rooftops or hillsides providing unobstructed views of the diamond. Elsewhere, fans are cramming onto the tops of parking garages or apartment patios for a glimpse of live major league action. And if you’re intent on catching a home run ball, there’s always McCovey Cove in San Francisco Bay, a perfect spot for kayakers to chase down any long ball that drops into the water. See more at the link in our bio. Photos by @besolomon.
    Baseball fans have found ways to watch live baseball in person this season despite not being allowed in the stands. The coronavirus pandemic chopped baseball’s season from 162 games per team and 68 million tickets sold to 60 games per team with zero tickets sold. But in many cities, enterprising fans have found vantage points to sneak a free look. In some cities, like Chicago and Los Angeles, this has been possible for decades, with nearby rooftops or hillsides providing unobstructed views of the diamond. Elsewhere, fans are cramming onto the tops of parking garages or apartment patios for a glimpse of live major league action. And if you’re intent on catching a home run ball, there’s always McCovey Cove in San Francisco Bay, a perfect spot for kayakers to chase down any long ball that drops into the water. See more at the link in our bio. Photos by @besolomon.
    The half-mile or so between Times Square and Grand Central Terminal along 42nd Street, the heart of Midtown Manhattan, is ordinarily stoked by commerce and commuters. Its daily life, architecture and economy have taken shape over the years in no small measure as a consequence of legislative and political maneuvers, legal squabbles, regulations and court decisions.

Our architecture critic @michael_kimmelman took a virtual stroll along the Midtown corridor with the @harvardgsd professor Jerold Kayden, looking at the legal battles and innovations that shaped the area.

Tap the link in our bio for a legal-minded itinerary along 42nd Street, from Times Square to the East River, taking in the @unitednations, Tudor City and @rochedinkeloo’s recently, lovingly renovated @fordfoundation, all architectural must-sees.  Photos by @zackdezon.
    The half-mile or so between Times Square and Grand Central Terminal along 42nd Street, the heart of Midtown Manhattan, is ordinarily stoked by commerce and commuters. Its daily life, architecture and economy have taken shape over the years in no small measure as a consequence of legislative and political maneuvers, legal squabbles, regulations and court decisions. Our architecture critic @michael_kimmelman took a virtual stroll along the Midtown corridor with the @harvardgsd professor Jerold Kayden, looking at the legal battles and innovations that shaped the area. Tap the link in our bio for a legal-minded itinerary along 42nd Street, from Times Square to the East River, taking in the @unitednations, Tudor City and @rochedinkeloo’s recently, lovingly renovated @fordfoundation, all architectural must-sees. Photos by @zackdezon.
    Meet one of the world’s few — and most sought after — bagel consultants.
 
Beth George is, officially, a lawyer. But since 2013, this self-taught baker has worked day and night advising people across the globe on how to perfect their techniques for delicious bagel baking.
 
Working from a commercial kitchen in New Jersey under the name @byobbagels — for both Be Your Own Boss and Build Your Own Business — she has helped open about 50 bagel shops on almost every continent. From the Bahamas to Saudi Arabia, from India to the Horn of Africa, dozens of aspiring bagel bakers — novices and professionals — have hired her to provide and adapt recipes, guide their business plans and be their on-call troubleshooter for issues from kneading and rolling to boiling (or steaming) and baking.
 
“It’s only 5 ingredients: water, flour, sugar, salt, yeast. But the thing people don’t know about bagels is, it’s a process — and people have to realize that they’re buying into that process,” she said. “What surprises me is how many people want to do this. Every day. It’s just crazy.”
 
Tap the link in our bio for more on this wellspring of bagel know-how. Photo by @michaelgeorge.
    Meet one of the world’s few — and most sought after — bagel consultants. Beth George is, officially, a lawyer. But since 2013, this self-taught baker has worked day and night advising people across the globe on how to perfect their techniques for delicious bagel baking. Working from a commercial kitchen in New Jersey under the name @byobbagels — for both Be Your Own Boss and Build Your Own Business — she has helped open about 50 bagel shops on almost every continent. From the Bahamas to Saudi Arabia, from India to the Horn of Africa, dozens of aspiring bagel bakers — novices and professionals — have hired her to provide and adapt recipes, guide their business plans and be their on-call troubleshooter for issues from kneading and rolling to boiling (or steaming) and baking. “It’s only 5 ingredients: water, flour, sugar, salt, yeast. But the thing people don’t know about bagels is, it’s a process — and people have to realize that they’re buying into that process,” she said. “What surprises me is how many people want to do this. Every day. It’s just crazy.” Tap the link in our bio for more on this wellspring of bagel know-how. Photo by @michaelgeorge.
    “I am deeply two-sided,” Lenny Kravitz writes. “Black and white. Jewish and Christian. Manhattanite and Brooklynite.”⁣
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In “Let Love Rule,” his new memoir, @lennykravitz recounts the first 25 years of his life, ending with the release of his debut album in 1989. The story he tells isn’t about stardom (that will come next, he says), but about the influences that inspired his distinctive musical hybrid of soul and classic rock.⁣
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The story of Kravitz’s early life is filled with revelations: Seeing the Jackson 5 at Madison Square Garden. Moving to California and discovering Led Zeppelin, skateboards and marijuana. Kiss. Steely Dan. Choral music. The opera “Tosca.” And, on the same plane of importance as Led Zeppelin, Prince. “When I saw Prince, I saw myself,” he writes.⁣
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Tap the link in our bio to read more from our interview with Kravitz, discussing how he found his sound, his voice and his commitment to love and nonviolence. Photo by @danascruggs.⁣
    “I am deeply two-sided,” Lenny Kravitz writes. “Black and white. Jewish and Christian. Manhattanite and Brooklynite.”⁣ ⁣ In “Let Love Rule,” his new memoir, @lennykravitz recounts the first 25 years of his life, ending with the release of his debut album in 1989. The story he tells isn’t about stardom (that will come next, he says), but about the influences that inspired his distinctive musical hybrid of soul and classic rock.⁣ ⁣ The story of Kravitz’s early life is filled with revelations: Seeing the Jackson 5 at Madison Square Garden. Moving to California and discovering Led Zeppelin, skateboards and marijuana. Kiss. Steely Dan. Choral music. The opera “Tosca.” And, on the same plane of importance as Led Zeppelin, Prince. “When I saw Prince, I saw myself,” he writes.⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read more from our interview with Kravitz, discussing how he found his sound, his voice and his commitment to love and nonviolence. Photo by @danascruggs.⁣
    Where does one find calm these days? Try 2 miles above civilization. 

For @jimmychin, a professional photographer and mountaineer, the pandemic meant that he was at home in Wyoming for longer than he had been in 20 years. By early September, when he still couldn’t leave the country, Chin got to thinking about one of the biggest objectives in his home range. Known as the Grand Traverse, this 17.9-mile romp along the Tetons’ most thrilling skyline offers roughly 12,000 cumulative feet of climbing on 7 major summits. He invited 3 other climbers to join him — @conrad_anker, @sav.cummins, and @adreadedclimber — to do that thing they all do, for no better reason than the joy it brings. Not that things went exactly as planned. 

Tap the link in our bio to see more photos and videos, and read about their journey in @nytmag. Photos by @sav.cummins and @jimmychin.
    Where does one find calm these days? Try 2 miles above civilization. For @jimmychin, a professional photographer and mountaineer, the pandemic meant that he was at home in Wyoming for longer than he had been in 20 years. By early September, when he still couldn’t leave the country, Chin got to thinking about one of the biggest objectives in his home range. Known as the Grand Traverse, this 17.9-mile romp along the Tetons’ most thrilling skyline offers roughly 12,000 cumulative feet of climbing on 7 major summits. He invited 3 other climbers to join him — @conrad_anker, @sav.cummins, and @adreadedclimber — to do that thing they all do, for no better reason than the joy it brings. Not that things went exactly as planned. Tap the link in our bio to see more photos and videos, and read about their journey in @nytmag. Photos by @sav.cummins and @jimmychin.
    Young women have taken a frontline role in leading Thailand’s protests.⁣
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As tens of thousands of people have gathered for a series of pro-democracy protests in Thailand in recent weeks, many of the earliest and most vocal organizers of the rallies have been female students. At recent protests, women appeared to make up a majority of participants, too.⁣
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While the demonstrations are aimed at urging Thailand’s old guard to embrace new ideas, they have also addressed concerns that often don’t make it to the national stage. Many of them are specific to women, including abortion, taxes on menstrual products and school rules that force girls to conform to an outdated version of femininity.⁣
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Most of all, women are increasingly speaking out against a patriarchy that has long controlled the military, the monarchy and the Buddhist monkhood, Thailand’s most powerful institutions. They have joined a broader range of voices calling for greater say in a country where democracy has been in retreat, though the challenges for women remain steep even within the protest movement.⁣
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“The monarchy and the military have all the power in Thailand,” said Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, one of a core of female students who have galvanized the political opposition. “I shouldn’t be afraid to say that men have almost all the power in Thailand.”⁣
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Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photos by @amandamustard and @adamjdean.⁣
    Young women have taken a frontline role in leading Thailand’s protests.⁣ ⁣ As tens of thousands of people have gathered for a series of pro-democracy protests in Thailand in recent weeks, many of the earliest and most vocal organizers of the rallies have been female students. At recent protests, women appeared to make up a majority of participants, too.⁣ ⁣ While the demonstrations are aimed at urging Thailand’s old guard to embrace new ideas, they have also addressed concerns that often don’t make it to the national stage. Many of them are specific to women, including abortion, taxes on menstrual products and school rules that force girls to conform to an outdated version of femininity.⁣ ⁣ Most of all, women are increasingly speaking out against a patriarchy that has long controlled the military, the monarchy and the Buddhist monkhood, Thailand’s most powerful institutions. They have joined a broader range of voices calling for greater say in a country where democracy has been in retreat, though the challenges for women remain steep even within the protest movement.⁣ ⁣ “The monarchy and the military have all the power in Thailand,” said Panusaya Sithijirawattanakul, one of a core of female students who have galvanized the political opposition. “I shouldn’t be afraid to say that men have almost all the power in Thailand.”⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photos by @amandamustard and @adamjdean.⁣
    It's peak apple season, which means there's no better time to make this buttery apple skillet cake with caramel frosting. It’s better to err on the side of underbaking the cake slightly, since it makes for a gooier end result. Tap the link in our bio to try out @emcdowell's recipe from @nytcooking. Photo by @markweinbergnyc
    It's peak apple season, which means there's no better time to make this buttery apple skillet cake with caramel frosting. It’s better to err on the side of underbaking the cake slightly, since it makes for a gooier end result. Tap the link in our bio to try out @emcdowell's recipe from @nytcooking. Photo by @markweinbergnyc
    We made wildfire an enemy for 110 years — but it could have been an ally.

The U.S. efforts to suppress wildfires, particularly in the American West — as seen here in Oregon in 1955 — have often resembled military campaigns, in both their approach and their equipment. 

Starting with what became known as the Big Blowup — a massive fire in 1910 that scorched 3 million acres and killed 78 firefighters in the Northern Rockies — the U.S. Forest Service’s strategy mostly has been to put out fires as fast as possible. 

Several thousand soldiers were called out to help fight the 1910 fires, and in subsequent decades the @u.s.forestservice’s would align itself ever more closely with military tactics. Smoke jumpers held the same pride of place as elite paratroopers; hotshots resembled on-the-ground infantry. The agency gladly made itself the second home of the U.S. military’s castoff tankers, helicopters and jeeps. The fallen firefighters of 1910 were cast as selfless martyrs in a great national struggle.

But with climate change and shifting populations, we’re losing that war. Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photo by J R Eyerman/The LIFE Picture Collection, via Getty Images
    We made wildfire an enemy for 110 years — but it could have been an ally. The U.S. efforts to suppress wildfires, particularly in the American West — as seen here in Oregon in 1955 — have often resembled military campaigns, in both their approach and their equipment. Starting with what became known as the Big Blowup — a massive fire in 1910 that scorched 3 million acres and killed 78 firefighters in the Northern Rockies — the U.S. Forest Service’s strategy mostly has been to put out fires as fast as possible. Several thousand soldiers were called out to help fight the 1910 fires, and in subsequent decades the @u.s.forestservice’s would align itself ever more closely with military tactics. Smoke jumpers held the same pride of place as elite paratroopers; hotshots resembled on-the-ground infantry. The agency gladly made itself the second home of the U.S. military’s castoff tankers, helicopters and jeeps. The fallen firefighters of 1910 were cast as selfless martyrs in a great national struggle. But with climate change and shifting populations, we’re losing that war. Tap the link in our bio to read more. Photo by J R Eyerman/The LIFE Picture Collection, via Getty Images
    President Trump has selected Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative favorite, to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court.⁣
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Trump plans to announce on Saturday that she is his choice, according to people close to the process. The president met with Judge Barrett at the White House this week and came away impressed with a jurist who leading conservatives told him would be a female Antonin Scalia, referring to the justice who died in 2016 and for whom Judge Barrett clerked.⁣
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Tap the link in our bio for the latest on this developing story. Photo by @thecorum.⁣
    President Trump has selected Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a conservative favorite, to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court.⁣ ⁣ Trump plans to announce on Saturday that she is his choice, according to people close to the process. The president met with Judge Barrett at the White House this week and came away impressed with a jurist who leading conservatives told him would be a female Antonin Scalia, referring to the justice who died in 2016 and for whom Judge Barrett clerked.⁣ ⁣ Tap the link in our bio for the latest on this developing story. Photo by @thecorum.⁣
    Seven months since the Philippines enacted its first lockdown, the mirrors at Jolog’s Barbershop in Manila reflect the pain of the pandemic. 

The salon has always been something of a microcosm of the country, drawing rich and poor clientele even amid military coups, typhoons, terrorist attacks and a People Power revolution. But the pandemic has changed all that. These days, the shop is nearly empty. The din of chatter has been silenced, and the few people who nervously trickle in are in no mood for small talk.

“It’s very hard to get my mind wrapped around this,” said Rollie Magalona, the salon’s owner. “It used to be that we always have customers lined up. Now, we try to stay open until evening, but the streets are already deserted. What is worse, we may also get infected. You never know.”

Since March, the Philippines has been in various stages of lockdown, the longest stretch of any country in Asia. The barbers at Jolog’s are required to wear yellow medical coveralls and face shields, and customers are told to disinfect before entering the shop. Churches in this largely Roman Catholic nation have reopened but are only allowed to accommodate 10% of their capacities. Customers entering shopping malls must first have their temperatures checked, and areas are marked to prevent clustering.

But even with restrictions in place, the country is struggling to control the outbreak. Already, about 27.3 million Filipinos have lost their jobs because of the resulting economic downturn. 

Tap the link in our bio to read more about life under lockdown in Manila.  Photos by @jeszmann
    Seven months since the Philippines enacted its first lockdown, the mirrors at Jolog’s Barbershop in Manila reflect the pain of the pandemic. The salon has always been something of a microcosm of the country, drawing rich and poor clientele even amid military coups, typhoons, terrorist attacks and a People Power revolution. But the pandemic has changed all that. These days, the shop is nearly empty. The din of chatter has been silenced, and the few people who nervously trickle in are in no mood for small talk. “It’s very hard to get my mind wrapped around this,” said Rollie Magalona, the salon’s owner. “It used to be that we always have customers lined up. Now, we try to stay open until evening, but the streets are already deserted. What is worse, we may also get infected. You never know.” Since March, the Philippines has been in various stages of lockdown, the longest stretch of any country in Asia. The barbers at Jolog’s are required to wear yellow medical coveralls and face shields, and customers are told to disinfect before entering the shop. Churches in this largely Roman Catholic nation have reopened but are only allowed to accommodate 10% of their capacities. Customers entering shopping malls must first have their temperatures checked, and areas are marked to prevent clustering. But even with restrictions in place, the country is struggling to control the outbreak. Already, about 27.3 million Filipinos have lost their jobs because of the resulting economic downturn. Tap the link in our bio to read more about life under lockdown in Manila. Photos by @jeszmann
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