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    Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

    Photo by @thomaspeschak | Swimming in tandem, shark and surfer are portrayed in harmonious coexistence. Aliwal Shoal, near Durban in South Africa, is a popular dive site where visitors can swim with sharks in close quarters. The surfer is actually testing a prototype surfboard with a built‑in electronic shark deterrent. Here the deterrent is switched off, allowing the curious blacktip shark to check out the surfer. But when it was switched on, the shark immediately moved away, its sensitive electromagnetic organs having been overstimulated.  Even without the use of experimental deterrents, the risk of shark bites is already incredibly low; in 2018 worldwide there were just 66 unprovoked bites, of which four were fatal. For more shark photographs follow @thomaspeschak.
    Photo by @thomaspeschak | Swimming in tandem, shark and surfer are portrayed in harmonious coexistence. Aliwal Shoal, near Durban in South Africa, is a popular dive site where visitors can swim with sharks in close quarters. The surfer is actually testing a prototype surfboard with a built‑in electronic shark deterrent. Here the deterrent is switched off, allowing the curious blacktip shark to check out the surfer. But when it was switched on, the shark immediately moved away, its sensitive electromagnetic organs having been overstimulated. Even without the use of experimental deterrents, the risk of shark bites is already incredibly low; in 2018 worldwide there were just 66 unprovoked bites, of which four were fatal. For more shark photographs follow @thomaspeschak.
    Photo by @amytoensing | Long solstice evenings provide plenty of trampoline time in the Werk family’s backyard in Hays, Montana. The Werks, members of the Aaniiih tribe, live and ranch along the edge of an ambitious conservation project in central Montana. The American Prairie Reserve (APR), an independent, nonprofit organization, is working to create the largest nature reserve in the lower 48 by stitching together 3.5 million acres of private and public lands. APR’s goal is to remove all the cattle and replace them with 10,000 free-roaming bison, and allow this temperate grassland, one of the four left on our planet, to thrive and be forever protected. However, most ranching families that have worked this land for the last 125 years see this as a threat to their way of life. Many Native Americans, like the Werk family, whose ancestors lived on this land for tens of thousands of years before being forcibly pushed off, are wary of outsiders taking over but thankful to see the return of the bison. Says Toby Werk: “We know firsthand what it’s like to be taken off the land and destroyed.” In the February issue, the story “Prairie Divide” looks at this complex conservation project and how it’s impacting the land and the people who live there.
    Photo by @amytoensing | Long solstice evenings provide plenty of trampoline time in the Werk family’s backyard in Hays, Montana. The Werks, members of the Aaniiih tribe, live and ranch along the edge of an ambitious conservation project in central Montana. The American Prairie Reserve (APR), an independent, nonprofit organization, is working to create the largest nature reserve in the lower 48 by stitching together 3.5 million acres of private and public lands. APR’s goal is to remove all the cattle and replace them with 10,000 free-roaming bison, and allow this temperate grassland, one of the four left on our planet, to thrive and be forever protected. However, most ranching families that have worked this land for the last 125 years see this as a threat to their way of life. Many Native Americans, like the Werk family, whose ancestors lived on this land for tens of thousands of years before being forcibly pushed off, are wary of outsiders taking over but thankful to see the return of the bison. Says Toby Werk: “We know firsthand what it’s like to be taken off the land and destroyed.” In the February issue, the story “Prairie Divide” looks at this complex conservation project and how it’s impacting the land and the people who live there.
    Photo by @stevewinterphoto | From the "Tiger Next Door" in the December 2019 issue: Backstage in Spokane at a VIP reception at an illusionist's show which features two tigers.
    Photo by @stevewinterphoto | From the "Tiger Next Door" in the December 2019 issue: Backstage in Spokane at a VIP reception at an illusionist's show which features two tigers.
    Photo by @stephenwilkes | While scouting locations in southern Iceland, I captured the famous Seljalandsfoss waterfall. The waterfall drops 197 feet (60 meters) and is part of the Seljalands River. I was so mesmerized by the waterfall that I almost didn’t notice a tourist who was photographing on the opposite side. To see more photos from my travels near and far, follow me @stephenwilkes. #DayToNight #StephenWilkes #Iceland #waterfall #Seljalandsfoss
    Photo by @stephenwilkes | While scouting locations in southern Iceland, I captured the famous Seljalandsfoss waterfall. The waterfall drops 197 feet (60 meters) and is part of the Seljalands River. I was so mesmerized by the waterfall that I almost didn’t notice a tourist who was photographing on the opposite side. To see more photos from my travels near and far, follow me @stephenwilkes. #DayToNight #StephenWilkes #Iceland #waterfall #Seljalandsfoss
    Photo by @jimmychin | Walking the walk. @conrad_anker climbs a new route on Ulvetanna, aka the Wolf’s Fang in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. For more images of mountain adventures around the world, follow @jimmychin
    Photo by @jimmychin | Walking the walk. @conrad_anker climbs a new route on Ulvetanna, aka the Wolf’s Fang in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. For more images of mountain adventures around the world, follow @jimmychin
    Photo by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | This complex rock art panel on the San Rafael Swell, in Utah, has engravings that span thousands of years—from the archaic era to modern times. The site sits on a conspicuous rock overlooking the junction of a major creek with its tributary. The images are incredible. There is also considerable evidence of vandalism, as someone tried to take some of the engravings off the rock wall with a chisel. One of the reasons I started the nonprofit @ancientartarchive is to digitally preserve and share sites like this. Follow me @salvarezphoto and the @ancientartarchive for more.
    Photo by Stephen Alvarez @salvarezphoto | This complex rock art panel on the San Rafael Swell, in Utah, has engravings that span thousands of years—from the archaic era to modern times. The site sits on a conspicuous rock overlooking the junction of a major creek with its tributary. The images are incredible. There is also considerable evidence of vandalism, as someone tried to take some of the engravings off the rock wall with a chisel. One of the reasons I started the nonprofit @ancientartarchive is to digitally preserve and share sites like this. Follow me @salvarezphoto and the @ancientartarchive for more.
    Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | This banded krait was captured in D’ray Sap, Vietnam, by Vietnamese and international herpetologists searching for venomous scorpions, snakes, snails, frogs, and spiders in order to extract deadly toxins and use them to help discover pain medications and life- saving drugs.

Collecting venom from around the world, biomedical scientists hope to identify new remedies because there are currently few good alternatives to opioids. Venom has already led to one notable success, when scientists derived a drug for chronic pain from another of the world’s deadliest animals: the cone snail. For more, see our story "A World of Pain" in the January 2020 issue.
    Photo by David Guttenfelder @dguttenfelder | This banded krait was captured in D’ray Sap, Vietnam, by Vietnamese and international herpetologists searching for venomous scorpions, snakes, snails, frogs, and spiders in order to extract deadly toxins and use them to help discover pain medications and life- saving drugs. Collecting venom from around the world, biomedical scientists hope to identify new remedies because there are currently few good alternatives to opioids. Venom has already led to one notable success, when scientists derived a drug for chronic pain from another of the world’s deadliest animals: the cone snail. For more, see our story "A World of Pain" in the January 2020 issue.
    Photo By Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | On the outskirts of San Francisco, a lone mule deer has a view of the evening fog rolling in over the iconic #GoldenGateBridge. This beautiful view can be seen from #Hawkhill in Marin County along Highway 1.
    Photo By Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | On the outskirts of San Francisco, a lone mule deer has a view of the evening fog rolling in over the iconic #GoldenGateBridge. This beautiful view can be seen from #Hawkhill in Marin County along Highway 1.
    Photo by @beverlyjoubert | We humans have long been fascinated by the search for our origins … the place where our story began. Scientists are far from being able to agree on where that place might be, but some have suggested that the cradle of humanity might lie in the middle of the dry savanna in northeastern Botswana: the Makgadikgadi Pans. This may be a disputed claim, but the Makgadikgadi does at least seem like a suitably enigmatic spot when we try to imagine our collective ancestral home. Today the world's largest salt flats are famously crisscrossed by travelers of the hoofed and striped kind, but rewind some 200,000 years, and in place of a salty desert you would find a flourishing wetland teeming with wildlife. It is certainly intriguing to think about our earliest ancestors setting off from this watery haven, their own migratory pathways peeling away to all corners of the globe. #Makgadikgadi #Origins #aerialpathways
    Photo by @beverlyjoubert | We humans have long been fascinated by the search for our origins … the place where our story began. Scientists are far from being able to agree on where that place might be, but some have suggested that the cradle of humanity might lie in the middle of the dry savanna in northeastern Botswana: the Makgadikgadi Pans. This may be a disputed claim, but the Makgadikgadi does at least seem like a suitably enigmatic spot when we try to imagine our collective ancestral home. Today the world's largest salt flats are famously crisscrossed by travelers of the hoofed and striped kind, but rewind some 200,000 years, and in place of a salty desert you would find a flourishing wetland teeming with wildlife. It is certainly intriguing to think about our earliest ancestors setting off from this watery haven, their own migratory pathways peeling away to all corners of the globe. #Makgadikgadi #Origins #aerialpathways
    Photos by @babaktafreshi | The show never ended on this late November night, as I watched thunderstorms in Guatemala. An average of 40-50 lightning flashes occur every second on the planet, a total of 1.4 billion a year. Most occur over land in the tropics. Follow me @babaktafreshi for more of the World at Night photography. ⁣#storm #weather #climate #tropics
    Photos by @babaktafreshi | The show never ended on this late November night, as I watched thunderstorms in Guatemala. An average of 40-50 lightning flashes occur every second on the planet, a total of 1.4 billion a year. Most occur over land in the tropics. Follow me @babaktafreshi for more of the World at Night photography. ⁣#storm #weather #climate #tropics
    Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | Dot-shaped barchan dunes migrate with the wind across the plains of Wadi Hazar, in the Yemeni part of the Rub al Khali (Empty Quarter). Some stuff, like this unusual natural phenomenon, you don’t find in school books: “The universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.”—J. B. S. Haldane #paramotor To explore more of our Earth from above, follow @geosteinmetz.
    Photo by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz | Dot-shaped barchan dunes migrate with the wind across the plains of Wadi Hazar, in the Yemeni part of the Rub al Khali (Empty Quarter). Some stuff, like this unusual natural phenomenon, you don’t find in school books: “The universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.”—J. B. S. Haldane #paramotor To explore more of our Earth from above, follow @geosteinmetz.
    Photo by @renan_ozturk | A simple slice of home life: our dog Baloo in his winter element. As I move into the next decade, I'm hoping to consume less, eat local, and travel less—even though our work as journalists often depends on the latter. It's a hard balance to strike, but sometimes just being home is enough—and I bet the planet appreciates that. Follow @renan_ozturk for more slices of life.  #dog #husky
    Photo by @renan_ozturk | A simple slice of home life: our dog Baloo in his winter element. As I move into the next decade, I'm hoping to consume less, eat local, and travel less—even though our work as journalists often depends on the latter. It's a hard balance to strike, but sometimes just being home is enough—and I bet the planet appreciates that. Follow @renan_ozturk for more slices of life. #dog #husky
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