National Geographic
  • verified
  • natgeo
    • 21133帖子
    • 129关注
    • 125M粉丝

    Experience the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

    Photo by @renaeffendiphoto / Over the years, I have documented the plight of the more than 700,000 people displaced by the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in Azerbaijan in the 1990s. I found them living in miserable, inhumane conditions: some sheltered in dug-out holes meant for livestock, others squatted in abandoned train cars and industrial ruins of factories. In Azerbaijani language, "qaçqın" (refugee) became widely synonymous with "poor" and "dejected." As two decades went by, new generations of children were born into the limbo of muffled hopes that one day they’d be able to return home. For these vulnerable communities pushed to the margins of society, the pain of being uprooted by conflict became a deeply entrenched trauma that passed on to the next generations. 

I hope that the end of hostilities in Nagorno-Karabakh will evolve into a sustained and lasting peace that will give both sides displaced by this conflict a chance to go home and rebuild their lives. It will take years before they can rehabilitate physically and emotionally from these traumatic events. I am Azerbaijani, and it’s been very disturbing for me to observe thousands of Armenians fleeing Nagorno-Karabakh over the past month. I don’t wish them the same fate of the Azerbaijani refugees I had photographed. 

For generations, Azerbaijanis and Armenians have been living in peace side by side. But fueled by our respective identity crisis, this smoldering conflict is a product of two opposing nationalist narratives constructed and fed to us over the years. These narratives are damaging to our human psyche and our ability to co-exist peacefully. I hope the day will come when we can see each other not as two warring ethnicities, but as humans: friends, neighbors, business partners, relatives, just the way we used to be in the past. #Azerbaijan #Armenia #NKpeace
    Photo by @renaeffendiphoto / Over the years, I have documented the plight of the more than 700,000 people displaced by the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict in Azerbaijan in the 1990s. I found them living in miserable, inhumane conditions: some sheltered in dug-out holes meant for livestock, others squatted in abandoned train cars and industrial ruins of factories. In Azerbaijani language, "qaçqın" (refugee) became widely synonymous with "poor" and "dejected." As two decades went by, new generations of children were born into the limbo of muffled hopes that one day they’d be able to return home. For these vulnerable communities pushed to the margins of society, the pain of being uprooted by conflict became a deeply entrenched trauma that passed on to the next generations. I hope that the end of hostilities in Nagorno-Karabakh will evolve into a sustained and lasting peace that will give both sides displaced by this conflict a chance to go home and rebuild their lives. It will take years before they can rehabilitate physically and emotionally from these traumatic events. I am Azerbaijani, and it’s been very disturbing for me to observe thousands of Armenians fleeing Nagorno-Karabakh over the past month. I don’t wish them the same fate of the Azerbaijani refugees I had photographed. For generations, Azerbaijanis and Armenians have been living in peace side by side. But fueled by our respective identity crisis, this smoldering conflict is a product of two opposing nationalist narratives constructed and fed to us over the years. These narratives are damaging to our human psyche and our ability to co-exist peacefully. I hope the day will come when we can see each other not as two warring ethnicities, but as humans: friends, neighbors, business partners, relatives, just the way we used to be in the past. #Azerbaijan #Armenia #NKpeace
    Photos by @paoloverzone / Ph.D. candidate Jasmina Wiemann transports a selection of bird eggs through the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven, Connecticut. Bird eggs, such as these from tinamous, get their color from pigments such as protoporphyrin and biliverdin. Some fossilized dinosaur eggs also preserve these two compounds, hinting at their hues. (The holes were used to drain contents and prevent the interior from rotting, so shells can be dried and curated in the collection.) Follow @paoloverzone for more photos and stories.

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
    Photos by @paoloverzone / Ph.D. candidate Jasmina Wiemann transports a selection of bird eggs through the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven, Connecticut. Bird eggs, such as these from tinamous, get their color from pigments such as protoporphyrin and biliverdin. Some fossilized dinosaur eggs also preserve these two compounds, hinting at their hues. (The holes were used to drain contents and prevent the interior from rotting, so shells can be dried and curated in the collection.) Follow @paoloverzone for more photos and stories. Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
    Photo by @amytoensing / Exploring the woods near our camp in the Adirondack region of New York. Thankful for @nature_org for protecting these places. For more of this work, please visit my feed @amytoensing. @thephotosociety
#adk #deepdarkwoods
    Photo by @amytoensing / Exploring the woods near our camp in the Adirondack region of New York. Thankful for @nature_org for protecting these places. For more of this work, please visit my feed @amytoensing. @thephotosociety #adk #deepdarkwoods
    Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto / A few months ago, thanks to a special client, I had the opportunity to experiment with night photography. The project led me to reenact my childhood dreams, and I spent evenings taking pictures under the stars of Italy's Val di Chiana, the place where I was born and raised. Follow @gabrielegalimbertiphoto for more about my experiment. #valdichiana #castiglionfiorentino #cortona #tuscany #nightphotography
    Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto / A few months ago, thanks to a special client, I had the opportunity to experiment with night photography. The project led me to reenact my childhood dreams, and I spent evenings taking pictures under the stars of Italy's Val di Chiana, the place where I was born and raised. Follow @gabrielegalimbertiphoto for more about my experiment. #valdichiana #castiglionfiorentino #cortona #tuscany #nightphotography
    Photo by Karine Aigner @kaigner / Miami, Florida: The songbird trade is something Americans may think of as being overseas, but the truth is it exists in the backyards of the U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reports that 40 protected bird species in Florida are routinely trapped—mostly songbirds but also owls and hawks. According to Rene Taboas—an undercover officer who heads the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s songbird investigations whom we had permission to name—almost all songbird trapping in the state occurs in national parks and on state land and private property around Miami. Law enforcement officials who track the trade say it’s done largely by people either born in Cuba, where keeping songbirds is part of the culture, or of Cuban descent. 

The birds pictured here are in a holding cage before they are released back into the wild. Caged birds can lose their flight muscle. If long-term caged birds were released directly from captivity into the wild, most would die; some will even need to learn to feed themselves again.

Shot on assignment for @natgeo. Thanks to the @myfwc and @usfws team for doing the work they do. 
For more stories about the intersections between humans and animals, follow @kaigner. #songbirdtrade #birds #wildlifetrade #conservation

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
    Photo by Karine Aigner @kaigner / Miami, Florida: The songbird trade is something Americans may think of as being overseas, but the truth is it exists in the backyards of the U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reports that 40 protected bird species in Florida are routinely trapped—mostly songbirds but also owls and hawks. According to Rene Taboas—an undercover officer who heads the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s songbird investigations whom we had permission to name—almost all songbird trapping in the state occurs in national parks and on state land and private property around Miami. Law enforcement officials who track the trade say it’s done largely by people either born in Cuba, where keeping songbirds is part of the culture, or of Cuban descent. The birds pictured here are in a holding cage before they are released back into the wild. Caged birds can lose their flight muscle. If long-term caged birds were released directly from captivity into the wild, most would die; some will even need to learn to feed themselves again. Shot on assignment for @natgeo. Thanks to the @myfwc and @usfws team for doing the work they do. For more stories about the intersections between humans and animals, follow @kaigner. #songbirdtrade #birds #wildlifetrade #conservation Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
    Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl / A wedding party visits the Grandmother and Grandfather monument, named for the faces of an older man and woman carved into rock, in Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, in 2011. 
 
After more than 20 years of relative calm in Nagorno-Karabakh, fighting between Azeri and Armenian forces has been escalating since September 27, causing casualties and inflicting suffering on all sides. #nagornokarabakh
    Photo by Anastasia Taylor-Lind @anastasiatl / A wedding party visits the Grandmother and Grandfather monument, named for the faces of an older man and woman carved into rock, in Stepanakert, Nagorno-Karabakh, in 2011. After more than 20 years of relative calm in Nagorno-Karabakh, fighting between Azeri and Armenian forces has been escalating since September 27, causing casualties and inflicting suffering on all sides. #nagornokarabakh
    Photo by @kiliiiyuyan / The Hiawatha Belt is one of the most important symbols of democracy in the world. It represents the union of Native Nations of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy. The confederacy is believed to be the longest-living democracy in the world. A powerful influence on the United States' Founding Fathers, it is responsible for many of the ideas that American democracy is founded on. John and David Fadden, Mohawk tribal members, run the Six Nations Indian Museum in New York State, keeping a living history of Haudenosaunee culture, including replica wampum treaty belts like the Hiawatha Belt.

We owe a debt of gratitude to the Haudenosaunee and other Indigenous peoples for the gift of individual liberty. During Native American Heritage Month, we can pay our respects by becoming more aware of the modern Indigenous peoples in a simple way: by getting to know someone Native in our own community. 
Follow me @kiliiiyuyan for more from the Indigenous perspective. #nativeamericanheritage #sixnations #haudenosaunee #democracy
    Photo by @kiliiiyuyan / The Hiawatha Belt is one of the most important symbols of democracy in the world. It represents the union of Native Nations of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy. The confederacy is believed to be the longest-living democracy in the world. A powerful influence on the United States' Founding Fathers, it is responsible for many of the ideas that American democracy is founded on. John and David Fadden, Mohawk tribal members, run the Six Nations Indian Museum in New York State, keeping a living history of Haudenosaunee culture, including replica wampum treaty belts like the Hiawatha Belt. We owe a debt of gratitude to the Haudenosaunee and other Indigenous peoples for the gift of individual liberty. During Native American Heritage Month, we can pay our respects by becoming more aware of the modern Indigenous peoples in a simple way: by getting to know someone Native in our own community. Follow me @kiliiiyuyan for more from the Indigenous perspective. #nativeamericanheritage #sixnations #haudenosaunee #democracy
    Photo by Brendan Hoffman @hoffmanbrendan / The Baglihar Dam, a hydroelectric power project on the Chenab River, stands in the valley behind patrons of a roadside cafe in Baglihar, in the Jammu & Kashmir region of India. The dam provides much-needed electricity to India but has caused conflict with downstream neighbor Pakistan, which relies on water from the Chenab for agriculture. Follow me @hoffmanbrendan for more human stories from around the world. #baglihardam #jammuandkashmir #india

Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
    Photo by Brendan Hoffman @hoffmanbrendan / The Baglihar Dam, a hydroelectric power project on the Chenab River, stands in the valley behind patrons of a roadside cafe in Baglihar, in the Jammu & Kashmir region of India. The dam provides much-needed electricity to India but has caused conflict with downstream neighbor Pakistan, which relies on water from the Chenab for agriculture. Follow me @hoffmanbrendan for more human stories from around the world. #baglihardam #jammuandkashmir #india Check out Nat Geo's link in bio for more on this story.
    Photo by @tasneemalsultan / While Saudi Arabia is mostly known for its harsh desert landscape, there are fresh springs and wells, which many farmers rely on. This farmer sells vegetable in Qassim.
    Photo by @tasneemalsultan / While Saudi Arabia is mostly known for its harsh desert landscape, there are fresh springs and wells, which many farmers rely on. This farmer sells vegetable in Qassim.
    Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride / On a recent 6,000- foot (1,800m) climb, I encountered an old friend, a mountain goat that resides around 14,000 feet (4,200m) atop a peak in Colorado. Mountain goats can jump almost 12 feet (4m), and they're more closely related to antelopes than actual goats. These sure-footed creatures love salt and will travel miles to enjoy a natural salt deposit. Some will even follow hikers to lick salt from the urine they leave behind. For more mountain life, follow @pedromcbride. #mountaingoat #wildlife #mountains #nature #petemcbride
    Photo by Pete McBride @pedromcbride / On a recent 6,000- foot (1,800m) climb, I encountered an old friend, a mountain goat that resides around 14,000 feet (4,200m) atop a peak in Colorado. Mountain goats can jump almost 12 feet (4m), and they're more closely related to antelopes than actual goats. These sure-footed creatures love salt and will travel miles to enjoy a natural salt deposit. Some will even follow hikers to lick salt from the urine they leave behind. For more mountain life, follow @pedromcbride. #mountaingoat #wildlife #mountains #nature #petemcbride
    Photo by @beverlyjoubert / They are among the most iconic and instantly recognizable animals on the planet. Isn’t it strange then that giraffes are in some ways incredibly overlooked? The drastic decline in their population numbers didn’t receive global attention until only recently, prompting references to their "silent extinction." And despite how familiar that unmistakable long-necked shape may seem to us, so many aspects of giraffe lives and behavior remain a mystery, or have been long misunderstood. Compared to other African icons, such as elephants, rhinos, or lions, giraffes have been surprisingly understudied. It’s not easy to safeguard a creature we don’t really understand … so it’s more important than ever that we pay giraffes more attention. #giraffes #conservation #endangeredspecies
    Photo by @beverlyjoubert / They are among the most iconic and instantly recognizable animals on the planet. Isn’t it strange then that giraffes are in some ways incredibly overlooked? The drastic decline in their population numbers didn’t receive global attention until only recently, prompting references to their "silent extinction." And despite how familiar that unmistakable long-necked shape may seem to us, so many aspects of giraffe lives and behavior remain a mystery, or have been long misunderstood. Compared to other African icons, such as elephants, rhinos, or lions, giraffes have been surprisingly understudied. It’s not easy to safeguard a creature we don’t really understand … so it’s more important than ever that we pay giraffes more attention. #giraffes #conservation #endangeredspecies
    Photo by @beckythale /  60 years ago today, Ruby Bridges and her mother walked into William Frantz Elementary School, escorted by federal marshals. It marked the integration of schools in her native New Orleans and became an iconic depiction of desegregation in America. I had the privilege of taking this portrait for a profile in the magazine of her incredible life story and continued work. The morning of our shoot, temperatures in New Orleans soared and the air conditioning in our studio died, right on cue. My assistant scrambled to find a portable unit that arrived only moments before Ms. Bridges and barely kept the temperatures inside tolerable. She was completely un-phased by the sauna she stepped into, and looking back at these pictures now, I'm struck by her effortless joy.
    Photo by @beckythale / 60 years ago today, Ruby Bridges and her mother walked into William Frantz Elementary School, escorted by federal marshals. It marked the integration of schools in her native New Orleans and became an iconic depiction of desegregation in America. I had the privilege of taking this portrait for a profile in the magazine of her incredible life story and continued work. The morning of our shoot, temperatures in New Orleans soared and the air conditioning in our studio died, right on cue. My assistant scrambled to find a portable unit that arrived only moments before Ms. Bridges and barely kept the temperatures inside tolerable. She was completely un-phased by the sauna she stepped into, and looking back at these pictures now, I'm struck by her effortless joy.
    Photo by Karla Gachet @kchete77 / Mardonio Solorio poses for a portrait with his daughters, in Fresno, California. He was affected by a heat stroke in 2008 while working in the fields. Then about a year ago, he also got sprayed when a neighboring farm fumigated its crops next to the field where he and daughter Addilene (19, far right) were working. He has respiratory problems as a result. #HEAT #migrantfarmworkers #CentralValley
    Photo by Karla Gachet @kchete77 / Mardonio Solorio poses for a portrait with his daughters, in Fresno, California. He was affected by a heat stroke in 2008 while working in the fields. Then about a year ago, he also got sprayed when a neighboring farm fumigated its crops next to the field where he and daughter Addilene (19, far right) were working. He has respiratory problems as a result. #HEAT #migrantfarmworkers #CentralValley
    Photo by @amivitale / We are born with an inherent understanding and a deep connection between one another and animals. Here, Andy shares a moment with his horse in Montana. Right now, nature has sent us a strong message and reminded all of us of just how small and deeply interconnected our world is. It is a powerful moment to reimagine our relationship to nature and to one other. When we see ourselves as part of the landscape and part of nature, then we recognize that saving nature is really about saving ourselves. Our fates are linked.

Planet Earth is the only home we have, and I want everyone to experience and benefit from the diversity of habitat and life in all of its forms—from glaciers to deserts, elephants to the tiniest of ants. What happens next is in all of our hands: Our actions today determine the future for generations after us. Nature is resilient if we give it a chance, and we owe it to future generations to give it that chance. Follow @amivitale for more stories about connections between humanity and nature. @nature_org @centennialvalleyassociation @thephotosociety #bigskycountry #horses #children #montana #conservation
    Photo by @amivitale / We are born with an inherent understanding and a deep connection between one another and animals. Here, Andy shares a moment with his horse in Montana. Right now, nature has sent us a strong message and reminded all of us of just how small and deeply interconnected our world is. It is a powerful moment to reimagine our relationship to nature and to one other. When we see ourselves as part of the landscape and part of nature, then we recognize that saving nature is really about saving ourselves. Our fates are linked. Planet Earth is the only home we have, and I want everyone to experience and benefit from the diversity of habitat and life in all of its forms—from glaciers to deserts, elephants to the tiniest of ants. What happens next is in all of our hands: Our actions today determine the future for generations after us. Nature is resilient if we give it a chance, and we owe it to future generations to give it that chance. Follow @amivitale for more stories about connections between humanity and nature. @nature_org @centennialvalleyassociation @thephotosociety #bigskycountry #horses #children #montana #conservation
    Photo by @jimmychin / They say if you don’t like the weather in the mountains, wait five minutes. A clearing storm above the Tetons, in Wyoming. For more images of mountain adventures around the world, follow @jimmychin.
    Photo by @jimmychin / They say if you don’t like the weather in the mountains, wait five minutes. A clearing storm above the Tetons, in Wyoming. For more images of mountain adventures around the world, follow @jimmychin.
    Photo by @edkashi / Mothers Emma Bordegaray, 28, and Mariah Kennedy, 28, hang out on the Rio Grande River in Albuquerque, New Mexico. #moms #newmexico #america #family #albuquerque
    Photo by @edkashi / Mothers Emma Bordegaray, 28, and Mariah Kennedy, 28, hang out on the Rio Grande River in Albuquerque, New Mexico. #moms #newmexico #america #family #albuquerque
    Photo by @erintrieb / On Election Day I set up a portrait studio outside a polling station in Houston, Texas, where I asked voters if I could photograph them. It was a heart-warming experience to hear in their own words—and some were first-time voters— what it meant to exercise their 15th Amendment right. 

Maria Pequeno, left, from Mexico, and Basma Abel, right, from Morocco, pose outside the @nrgpark polling station in Houston,  on November 3. Says Basma: “Voting is just doing the right thing. We’re both immigrants, and a lot of times our voices aren’t heard, so we’re trying to change that.” Maria adds: “In our case, we’re minorities, and in our culture not everyone knows that it’s important for them to vote and that their vote counts. We want to show our family and friends that if we can do it, they can do it. Everyone’s voice is important here.” 

For more human stories from around the world follow @erintrieb.
    Photo by @erintrieb / On Election Day I set up a portrait studio outside a polling station in Houston, Texas, where I asked voters if I could photograph them. It was a heart-warming experience to hear in their own words—and some were first-time voters— what it meant to exercise their 15th Amendment right. Maria Pequeno, left, from Mexico, and Basma Abel, right, from Morocco, pose outside the @nrgpark polling station in Houston, on November 3. Says Basma: “Voting is just doing the right thing. We’re both immigrants, and a lot of times our voices aren’t heard, so we’re trying to change that.” Maria adds: “In our case, we’re minorities, and in our culture not everyone knows that it’s important for them to vote and that their vote counts. We want to show our family and friends that if we can do it, they can do it. Everyone’s voice is important here.” For more human stories from around the world follow @erintrieb.
    Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski / A stream of white water flows through a perfect stripe of erosion in Utah's Zion National Park. This unique feature is called the Ribbon, which is visible in the fall when water levels are low.
    Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski / A stream of white water flows through a perfect stripe of erosion in Utah's Zion National Park. This unique feature is called the Ribbon, which is visible in the fall when water levels are low.
      Download index side qrcode