Hilaree Nelson (@hilareenelson) instagram网页版-veryins.com
Hilaree Nelson
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    Getting fired up for winter ❄️
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📸 @jxnfigs
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@blizzardskis #getoutside #wildplaces #ilovewinter
    Getting fired up for winter ❄️ . 📸 @jxnfigs . @blizzardskis #getoutside #wildplaces #ilovewinter
    “I would much rather die in a rocking chair at 100 years old.”
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@finelinesdocumentary is now available for pre-order on @itunes! Link in bio to check it out 🙏
    “I would much rather die in a rocking chair at 100 years old.” . @finelinesdocumentary is now available for pre-order on @itunes! Link in bio to check it out 🙏
    I strongly feel that we had to capitalize on that final day of good weather or we wouldn’t have found success. We had a tiny window, and we capitalized on it. Thanks to @jimwmorrison’s incredible perseverance and motivation, he earned the respect of the Sherpa and we became a unified team.
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I think if @nickkalisz and @dutchsimpson hadn’t been so seriously stoked, motivated and grateful throughout the entire trip, our inspiration might have fallen short of the goal. Also, two of the Sherpa, Ila and Urken, summited Lhotse for their first time, and seeing how entirely stoked they were for their own accomplishment added so much energy to our team as a whole.
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Alas, while this was an insane amount of hard work, every little thing needed to go just right and, sometimes, those things came from unexpected places. At the end of the day, it paid off and we skied one of the most amazing lines of my life.
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So that’s my story of our Lhotse expedition from 2018. I know it was a little long…but I wanted to give more insight into the ins and outs of the trip. If you’d like to go back and read the full story again, just click on #Lhotse2018Story to read every post! Thanks for following along 😄 #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight
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@thenorthface @msr_gear @clifbar @adventuremedicalkits @gopro @anker_official @xtreme_climbers @blackdiamond @blizzardskis @dynafit @tecnica_sports @alpinestartfoods @protectourwinters @timsnaturals @julboeyewearna
    I strongly feel that we had to capitalize on that final day of good weather or we wouldn’t have found success. We had a tiny window, and we capitalized on it. Thanks to @jimwmorrison’s incredible perseverance and motivation, he earned the respect of the Sherpa and we became a unified team. . I think if @nickkalisz and @dutchsimpson hadn’t been so seriously stoked, motivated and grateful throughout the entire trip, our inspiration might have fallen short of the goal. Also, two of the Sherpa, Ila and Urken, summited Lhotse for their first time, and seeing how entirely stoked they were for their own accomplishment added so much energy to our team as a whole. . Alas, while this was an insane amount of hard work, every little thing needed to go just right and, sometimes, those things came from unexpected places. At the end of the day, it paid off and we skied one of the most amazing lines of my life. . So that’s my story of our Lhotse expedition from 2018. I know it was a little long…but I wanted to give more insight into the ins and outs of the trip. If you’d like to go back and read the full story again, just click on #Lhotse2018Story to read every post! Thanks for following along 😄 #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight . @thenorthface @msr_gear @clifbar @adventuremedicalkits @gopro @anker_official @xtreme_climbers @blackdiamond @blizzardskis @dynafit @tecnica_sports @alpinestartfoods @protectourwinters @timsnaturals @julboeyewearna
    The ski was incredible. Really hard, but just incredible. The most difficult part was the Couloir itself. The conditions were all over the map- ice, windslab, breakable crust, recycled powder, etc. but, let’s be honest, trying to ski from above 8000 meters, one really has to temper expectations. The sketchiest sections were the turns off the top (Jim skied it clean, I used a fixed line as a hand wrap for the first couple of turns), and the super steep, narrow choke that was barely 175cm wide. Any fall in those zones would’ve been pretty disastrous.
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The other challenge was breathing. Every turn brought on tons of heavy breathing and panting. I had to focus on “pre-breathing” so that I could oxygenate before I committed to each turn.
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The further down we got, the more in the groove we were and we could start to link more and more turns. Once out on the Lhotse face, we had way more consistent conditions. This was where both Jim and I actually started smiling and laughing. The Lhotse face is probably close to a half mile wide and on skis we could fly back and forth across the face in a way you could never do with down-climbing. The whole descent took us around 4 hours. We stopped at camp 3 and picked up a bunch of our stuff and made it back to camp 2 at about 6 o’clock at night just as sun was setting.
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Both @nickkalisz and @dutchsimpson summited with us that day- their first 8000 meter peak ever. They did an amazing job of filming the entire ski descent of the upper coulior. We parted ways on the Lhotse face as we were much faster on skis than they were walking. They arrived at Camp 2, joined by Paldin and Tashi who waited at Camp 3 for those guys, a little while after us. We joined with the sherpas for a celebratory shot of our coveted whiskey, high five’d and all stumbled off to our sleeping bags. Mission accomplished. #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight
    The ski was incredible. Really hard, but just incredible. The most difficult part was the Couloir itself. The conditions were all over the map- ice, windslab, breakable crust, recycled powder, etc. but, let’s be honest, trying to ski from above 8000 meters, one really has to temper expectations. The sketchiest sections were the turns off the top (Jim skied it clean, I used a fixed line as a hand wrap for the first couple of turns), and the super steep, narrow choke that was barely 175cm wide. Any fall in those zones would’ve been pretty disastrous. . The other challenge was breathing. Every turn brought on tons of heavy breathing and panting. I had to focus on “pre-breathing” so that I could oxygenate before I committed to each turn. . The further down we got, the more in the groove we were and we could start to link more and more turns. Once out on the Lhotse face, we had way more consistent conditions. This was where both Jim and I actually started smiling and laughing. The Lhotse face is probably close to a half mile wide and on skis we could fly back and forth across the face in a way you could never do with down-climbing. The whole descent took us around 4 hours. We stopped at camp 3 and picked up a bunch of our stuff and made it back to camp 2 at about 6 o’clock at night just as sun was setting. . Both @nickkalisz and @dutchsimpson summited with us that day- their first 8000 meter peak ever. They did an amazing job of filming the entire ski descent of the upper coulior. We parted ways on the Lhotse face as we were much faster on skis than they were walking. They arrived at Camp 2, joined by Paldin and Tashi who waited at Camp 3 for those guys, a little while after us. We joined with the sherpas for a celebratory shot of our coveted whiskey, high five’d and all stumbled off to our sleeping bags. Mission accomplished. #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight
    At around 2am, @nickkalisz, @dutchsimpson, @jimwmorrison, Tashi Sherpa, @ila_Nuru and I turned on our headlamps and started up for the summit. Temps were pretty gnarly cold 🥶but there was no wind. We had chosen early on to forego setting up at Camp 4, which enabled us to stay light on equipment. This meant our summit day would be about 4,000 feet of climbing. At home in Telluride, 4,000 feet on similar terrain would likely take less than 4 hours. At 24,000 feet, without O’s, we expected it to take 10-12 hours.
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The climbing was straight-forward but difficult in terms of trail-breaking. The trail that Urkin, Paldin and Fura put in the day before was all but gone from snow drifting along the face overnight. At around 26,500 feet Jim and I realized that we were going too slow to reach the summit and make the ski descent before dark descended on the mountain. With the forecast calling for the wind to start kicking up around 2pm, we prioritized skiing over no O’s. At this point we both donned oxygen masks, the benefits being twofold: 1. our frozen bodies warmed up, and 2. we were able to move much faster over the difficult terrain of the final 1500 feet.
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We were standing on the summit by 1:30pm. It took about 12 hours to get to the top. The summit was SO incredible, and we were the only people on the mountain. I don’t even know where to begin in explaining how surreal it was. I couldn’t stop looking at Everest either. It’s entirely possible that Everest is more incredible to look at from the summit of Lhotse than it is to stand atop. Despite the bad rap this peak gets in the public arena, I think it’s the most aesthetic and beautiful mountain on the planet.
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In keeping with the forecast, right at 2pm the winds starting picking up and the temps dropped like a stone. It was time to get moving. On the ascent we were blown away by how filled in the Coulior was and the reality that we could very likely ski the whole 7000ft without ropes or rappels was beyond exhilarating. #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight
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@alpinestartfoods @gopro
    At around 2am, @nickkalisz, @dutchsimpson, @jimwmorrison, Tashi Sherpa, @ila_Nuru and I turned on our headlamps and started up for the summit. Temps were pretty gnarly cold 🥶but there was no wind. We had chosen early on to forego setting up at Camp 4, which enabled us to stay light on equipment. This meant our summit day would be about 4,000 feet of climbing. At home in Telluride, 4,000 feet on similar terrain would likely take less than 4 hours. At 24,000 feet, without O’s, we expected it to take 10-12 hours. . The climbing was straight-forward but difficult in terms of trail-breaking. The trail that Urkin, Paldin and Fura put in the day before was all but gone from snow drifting along the face overnight. At around 26,500 feet Jim and I realized that we were going too slow to reach the summit and make the ski descent before dark descended on the mountain. With the forecast calling for the wind to start kicking up around 2pm, we prioritized skiing over no O’s. At this point we both donned oxygen masks, the benefits being twofold: 1. our frozen bodies warmed up, and 2. we were able to move much faster over the difficult terrain of the final 1500 feet. . We were standing on the summit by 1:30pm. It took about 12 hours to get to the top. The summit was SO incredible, and we were the only people on the mountain. I don’t even know where to begin in explaining how surreal it was. I couldn’t stop looking at Everest either. It’s entirely possible that Everest is more incredible to look at from the summit of Lhotse than it is to stand atop. Despite the bad rap this peak gets in the public arena, I think it’s the most aesthetic and beautiful mountain on the planet. . In keeping with the forecast, right at 2pm the winds starting picking up and the temps dropped like a stone. It was time to get moving. On the ascent we were blown away by how filled in the Coulior was and the reality that we could very likely ski the whole 7000ft without ropes or rappels was beyond exhilarating. #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight . @alpinestartfoods @gopro
    On the morning of September 28th, our first morning after skiing from Camp 3 at 24,000ft, we received our much anticipated weather report (swipe to last pic to see). The info in that report would determine our actions over the next several days but most importantly, when we needed to leave for our summit attempt.
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In a nutshell, the report forecasted the jet stream to start descending on the high elevations on Sep 30th. This meant that the winds would start to increase on the summit at a rather alarming rate. By the morning of Oct 1st, winds were expected to reach speeds of 40-60 km/hr and by Oct 2nd, the winds would be be at a sustained 70-80 km/hr. This was very bad news because climbing in those kinds of winds meant drastically cold temperatures and serious risk of all the snow blowing away.
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Evasive action was necessary, and after a couple lengthy discussions with the whole team, we decided we had to head out the next morning. This gave us only 1 rest day at camp 2 after a fairly big effort the prior two days. @nickkalisz had still been feeling sick and was using oxygen and taking antibiotics but had decided not to descend. He wanted to join us for the summit attempt and so we rested as best we could on the 28th and prepped for an early departure the next morning.
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On Sept 29th, we set out for Camp 3 with the sunrise. We covered the 2500 feet in only 4 hours- a huge improvement from our first foray to C3. This was super helpful because it gave each of us more time to rest for the planned 12:30 am wake-up call the next morning. @jimwomorrison and I had decided to attempt the climb without supplemental oxygen so we rested more than slept that night, anxious for the next day and whether or not we would be able to beat the wind to the top of Lhotse. #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight
    On the morning of September 28th, our first morning after skiing from Camp 3 at 24,000ft, we received our much anticipated weather report (swipe to last pic to see). The info in that report would determine our actions over the next several days but most importantly, when we needed to leave for our summit attempt. . In a nutshell, the report forecasted the jet stream to start descending on the high elevations on Sep 30th. This meant that the winds would start to increase on the summit at a rather alarming rate. By the morning of Oct 1st, winds were expected to reach speeds of 40-60 km/hr and by Oct 2nd, the winds would be be at a sustained 70-80 km/hr. This was very bad news because climbing in those kinds of winds meant drastically cold temperatures and serious risk of all the snow blowing away. . Evasive action was necessary, and after a couple lengthy discussions with the whole team, we decided we had to head out the next morning. This gave us only 1 rest day at camp 2 after a fairly big effort the prior two days. @nickkalisz had still been feeling sick and was using oxygen and taking antibiotics but had decided not to descend. He wanted to join us for the summit attempt and so we rested as best we could on the 28th and prepped for an early departure the next morning. . On Sept 29th, we set out for Camp 3 with the sunrise. We covered the 2500 feet in only 4 hours- a huge improvement from our first foray to C3. This was super helpful because it gave each of us more time to rest for the planned 12:30 am wake-up call the next morning. @jimwomorrison and I had decided to attempt the climb without supplemental oxygen so we rested more than slept that night, anxious for the next day and whether or not we would be able to beat the wind to the top of Lhotse. #Lhotse2018Story #Futurelight
    Please check out this trailer for @sherpascinema’s Defiance. Amazing footage of #tnfathletes @leannepelosi @victordelerue and @jake_blauvelt in BC this past winter. 😳 🏂 🤯💪 .

See link in bio for the full film
    Please check out this trailer for @sherpascinema’s Defiance. Amazing footage of #tnfathletes @leannepelosi @victordelerue and @jake_blauvelt in BC this past winter. 😳 🏂 🤯💪 . See link in bio for the full film
    Sept 25th was a rest day for us while the Sherpa worked to extend the route from the Bergschrund up the Lhotse face to Camp 3. The following day all 9 of us got a 5am start to climb to C3 with the intention of sleeping at our high camp at 24k. It was an intensely cold morning and early on @nickkalisz decided to turn back because he was too cold and not feeling well.
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After about 6 hours of climbing we reached camp and with the help of  @Urkensherpa171, @namgye, @furayangji, @ila_nuru, and Tashi, we managed to dig out platforms and pitch our two #assault tents. The Sherpa descended and Dutch, Jim and I hunkered down for a long, uncomfortable night.
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It’s pretty tough to sleep on your first foray into the real high elevations but, if there’s an upside, it’s that we were all awake for the incredible sunrise the next morning. With the sun came the first hint of warming and Jim and I stepped into our skis to give a serious go at the steepest part of the Lhotse face. This was the real deal and an important warm up to sort out the route for the upcoming summit attempt. We methodically skied 1500ft to the snow bridge on the schrund, navigating around the strips of blue ice. Once we got in the groove with the elevation and exposure, we started grinning because it felt like all the pieces of this massive puzzle were falling into place.
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We descended all the way to C2.  We were now ready to go for the summit!!! #Lhotse2018Story #futurelight
    Sept 25th was a rest day for us while the Sherpa worked to extend the route from the Bergschrund up the Lhotse face to Camp 3. The following day all 9 of us got a 5am start to climb to C3 with the intention of sleeping at our high camp at 24k. It was an intensely cold morning and early on @nickkalisz decided to turn back because he was too cold and not feeling well. . After about 6 hours of climbing we reached camp and with the help of @Urkensherpa171, @namgye, @furayangji, @ila_nuru, and Tashi, we managed to dig out platforms and pitch our two #assault tents. The Sherpa descended and Dutch, Jim and I hunkered down for a long, uncomfortable night. . It’s pretty tough to sleep on your first foray into the real high elevations but, if there’s an upside, it’s that we were all awake for the incredible sunrise the next morning. With the sun came the first hint of warming and Jim and I stepped into our skis to give a serious go at the steepest part of the Lhotse face. This was the real deal and an important warm up to sort out the route for the upcoming summit attempt. We methodically skied 1500ft to the snow bridge on the schrund, navigating around the strips of blue ice. Once we got in the groove with the elevation and exposure, we started grinning because it felt like all the pieces of this massive puzzle were falling into place. . We descended all the way to C2. We were now ready to go for the summit!!! #Lhotse2018Story #futurelight
    Continuing with #Lhotse2018Story -
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We gave ourselves one day to settle in to Camp 2 and rest after the #sufferfest from the day before. While a ton of snow (close to two feet) had fallen between BC and Camp 1, we were relieved to see that the Lhotse Face had received little to no snow and this would still be safe to ascend. It was truly the perfect scenario- the sun was shining, there didn’t appear to be any flagging on the summits (which means little to no wind) and for the first time of the entire trip I could feel myself getting really excited that we might pull this off.
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The next day Jim and I rallied to put in the route from camp 2 to the Bergschrund, which marks the official start or the “meat” of the Lhotse face. It’s a 1,000 ft. of elevation gain that is fairly low angle, but winds through many crevasses and is exposed to rockfall from the south face of Everest. The Bergschrund would be our first hurdle- both Jim and I wanted to see if it could be skied.
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To put it in perspective, back in 2012, it was a 30 foot ice climb to get up and over Bergrschrund to access the face above. The reality in the fall of 2018 was that the schrund was filled in enough so there was a two foot wide section that actually linked the above Lhotse face to the glacier below- a very skiable bridge. I was blown away. I couldn’t contain my excitement and started laughing and high-fiving with Jim.
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The sun was out, we were standing on the lower lip of the Bergschrund looking at what appeared to be pretty good conditions above us and we were seriously stoked. This was the first time in the trip we went skiing. We both stepped into our bindings at 22,500 feet and skied back down to Camp 2. #Lhotse2018Story #FUTURELIGHT
    Continuing with #Lhotse2018Story - . We gave ourselves one day to settle in to Camp 2 and rest after the #sufferfest from the day before. While a ton of snow (close to two feet) had fallen between BC and Camp 1, we were relieved to see that the Lhotse Face had received little to no snow and this would still be safe to ascend. It was truly the perfect scenario- the sun was shining, there didn’t appear to be any flagging on the summits (which means little to no wind) and for the first time of the entire trip I could feel myself getting really excited that we might pull this off. . The next day Jim and I rallied to put in the route from camp 2 to the Bergschrund, which marks the official start or the “meat” of the Lhotse face. It’s a 1,000 ft. of elevation gain that is fairly low angle, but winds through many crevasses and is exposed to rockfall from the south face of Everest. The Bergschrund would be our first hurdle- both Jim and I wanted to see if it could be skied. . To put it in perspective, back in 2012, it was a 30 foot ice climb to get up and over Bergrschrund to access the face above. The reality in the fall of 2018 was that the schrund was filled in enough so there was a two foot wide section that actually linked the above Lhotse face to the glacier below- a very skiable bridge. I was blown away. I couldn’t contain my excitement and started laughing and high-fiving with Jim. . The sun was out, we were standing on the lower lip of the Bergschrund looking at what appeared to be pretty good conditions above us and we were seriously stoked. This was the first time in the trip we went skiing. We both stepped into our bindings at 22,500 feet and skied back down to Camp 2. #Lhotse2018Story #FUTURELIGHT
    Taking a quick break from my Lhotse story, because I’m reeling from an amazing @protectourwinters athlete gathering in Moab UT. I learned a ton from all the hard working and incredibly passionate people that were at the summit.
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What’s the most important way to affect change for the 2020 elections?
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Let’s talk about margins. Yes, margins––I’m especially familiar with them as a ski mountaineer climbing at the highest elevations on the globe where mere ounces can mean the difference between success and failure.
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As it happens, environmental and political history are also made at the margins. Now more than ever, this outdoor community led by YOU can deliver those small victories where they’re needed most. It doesn’t take a whole nation to create change, just a few thousand of the right people, in the right places, at just the right time.
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I’m partnering with @protectourwinters to build a robust strategy to kick some serious butt in 2020––a strategy that relies entirely on margins. Check out their PSA, get hyped, then recruit your friends by tagging them below. Not in on POW yet yourself? Text ACT4POW to 52886 or hit the link in my bio to get involved!
    Taking a quick break from my Lhotse story, because I’m reeling from an amazing @protectourwinters athlete gathering in Moab UT. I learned a ton from all the hard working and incredibly passionate people that were at the summit. . What’s the most important way to affect change for the 2020 elections? . Let’s talk about margins. Yes, margins––I’m especially familiar with them as a ski mountaineer climbing at the highest elevations on the globe where mere ounces can mean the difference between success and failure. . As it happens, environmental and political history are also made at the margins. Now more than ever, this outdoor community led by YOU can deliver those small victories where they’re needed most. It doesn’t take a whole nation to create change, just a few thousand of the right people, in the right places, at just the right time. . I’m partnering with @protectourwinters to build a robust strategy to kick some serious butt in 2020––a strategy that relies entirely on margins. Check out their PSA, get hyped, then recruit your friends by tagging them below. Not in on POW yet yourself? Text ACT4POW to 52886 or hit the link in my bio to get involved!
    We reveled in the relative comfort of base camp knowing it would be short-lived. We had only 2 days to relax and eat real food. The best part of BC was that our skis and boots finally arrived. I’ve been leaving that part out but it wasn’t until the day before we planned to leave for the summit that our ski gear showed up. 😱 Due to the lingering monsoon in the lower valleys, most of our stuff was tied up in Kathmandu and Lukla until mid-September. Needless to say, the relief was palpable for Jim and I. Jim’s face in the first picture says it all 😃.
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We had a false start for Camp 2 on the 21st as another snowstorm turned us around. On the 22nd, walking in our ski boots and carrying our skis, we managed to push through to Camp 2 in a 12 hour day.
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12 HOURS. Climbing in ski boots. It was pretty brutal. Our loads were heavy, the sherpa’s loads were even heavier and thus we were working really hard to break trail for the sherpa. The elevation gain from 17,500 to 21,000 in one go definitely  took a toll on each of us.  The weather was the polar opposite of our first climb to Camp 2. This time the heat was excruciating 🥵, the ☀️ was like the Death Star!! #Lhotse2018Story #FUTURELIGHT
    We reveled in the relative comfort of base camp knowing it would be short-lived. We had only 2 days to relax and eat real food. The best part of BC was that our skis and boots finally arrived. I’ve been leaving that part out but it wasn’t until the day before we planned to leave for the summit that our ski gear showed up. 😱 Due to the lingering monsoon in the lower valleys, most of our stuff was tied up in Kathmandu and Lukla until mid-September. Needless to say, the relief was palpable for Jim and I. Jim’s face in the first picture says it all 😃. . We had a false start for Camp 2 on the 21st as another snowstorm turned us around. On the 22nd, walking in our ski boots and carrying our skis, we managed to push through to Camp 2 in a 12 hour day. . 12 HOURS. Climbing in ski boots. It was pretty brutal. Our loads were heavy, the sherpa’s loads were even heavier and thus we were working really hard to break trail for the sherpa. The elevation gain from 17,500 to 21,000 in one go definitely took a toll on each of us. The weather was the polar opposite of our first climb to Camp 2. This time the heat was excruciating 🥵, the ☀️ was like the Death Star!! #Lhotse2018Story #FUTURELIGHT
    At one point on our way up to Camp 2, the clouds cleared for an instant, just long enough to see the summit of Everest, long enough to realize Everest was not where it was supposed to be. We quickly realized we were walking straight toward Nuptse and in a serious “oh sh$!” Moment, we made an about face to correct our route.
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As more time passed, the clouds lifted entirely. We made it to camp 2 just as the sun set. It was just the 4 of us, in 2 tents for 2 nights up there. The crazy thing is that during the spring season there are typically hundreds of people rotating through Camp 2 on a daily basis.
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We spent our time acclimating and building out camp so that our next rotation could be our last before we attempted to summit. @jimwmorrison and I descended to our interim camp to collect the 2 meter dome while @nickkalisz and @dutchsimpson worked their butts off building a massive platform for the big tent. We ate freeze-dried food and wandered the route in case future passes to C2 might be in the clouds again.
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Finally we tried to sleep but that was really hard due to headaches and the general discomfort at high altitude. After our second night we descended back through the ice fall to base camp. #Lhotse2018Story #FUTURELIGHT
    At one point on our way up to Camp 2, the clouds cleared for an instant, just long enough to see the summit of Everest, long enough to realize Everest was not where it was supposed to be. We quickly realized we were walking straight toward Nuptse and in a serious “oh sh$!” Moment, we made an about face to correct our route. . As more time passed, the clouds lifted entirely. We made it to camp 2 just as the sun set. It was just the 4 of us, in 2 tents for 2 nights up there. The crazy thing is that during the spring season there are typically hundreds of people rotating through Camp 2 on a daily basis. . We spent our time acclimating and building out camp so that our next rotation could be our last before we attempted to summit. @jimwmorrison and I descended to our interim camp to collect the 2 meter dome while @nickkalisz and @dutchsimpson worked their butts off building a massive platform for the big tent. We ate freeze-dried food and wandered the route in case future passes to C2 might be in the clouds again. . Finally we tried to sleep but that was really hard due to headaches and the general discomfort at high altitude. After our second night we descended back through the ice fall to base camp. #Lhotse2018Story #FUTURELIGHT
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