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    (That’s 100 degrees Fahrenheit. In Siberia). #Repost @gretathunberg
・・・
The extreme arctic heatwave continues... 
Last week the temperature reached 38°C in Verkhoyansk, Siberia, north of the arctic circle. 
And +34°C was just recorded at a latitude of 73 °N (high above the Arctic circle...) today in Russia. That is about +20-25 °C warmer than normal.
But equally worrying is the fact that our societies fail to grasp the full meaning of this.
The longer the climate crisis is being ignored or downplayed - the longer people will remain unaware. And the political inaction is allowed to continue.
Picture credit: Scott Duncan
    (That’s 100 degrees Fahrenheit. In Siberia). #Repost @gretathunberg ・・・ The extreme arctic heatwave continues... Last week the temperature reached 38°C in Verkhoyansk, Siberia, north of the arctic circle. And +34°C was just recorded at a latitude of 73 °N (high above the Arctic circle...) today in Russia. That is about +20-25 °C warmer than normal. But equally worrying is the fact that our societies fail to grasp the full meaning of this. The longer the climate crisis is being ignored or downplayed - the longer people will remain unaware. And the political inaction is allowed to continue. Picture credit: Scott Duncan
    All eyes on should be on Kentucky today.

We organize.
We take action.
We fight.
We vote.

There are no Jim Crow signs but Jim Crow laws are alive and kicking.

The state of Kentucky has reduced 3700 polling places down to 200 for this Tuesday’s election. In Louisville, where Breonna Taylor was killed, over 600,000 people are expected to vote at ONE polling place.

Voting is a tool to build power. This is clear suppression of Black Voices and votes at the polls. This is another form of state-sanctioned disregard for Black life. Don’t let the attempts to suppress our voices succeed. Help us to protect Black political power. *swipe left* to help keep #AllEyesOnKentucky #DefendBlackLife 
Repost via @mvmnt4blklives
    All eyes on should be on Kentucky today. We organize. We take action. We fight. We vote. There are no Jim Crow signs but Jim Crow laws are alive and kicking. The state of Kentucky has reduced 3700 polling places down to 200 for this Tuesday’s election. In Louisville, where Breonna Taylor was killed, over 600,000 people are expected to vote at ONE polling place. Voting is a tool to build power. This is clear suppression of Black Voices and votes at the polls. This is another form of state-sanctioned disregard for Black life. Don’t let the attempts to suppress our voices succeed. Help us to protect Black political power. *swipe left* to help keep #AllEyesOnKentucky #DefendBlackLife Repost via @mvmnt4blklives
    Thanks for the in depth history @jamsvy happy #juneteenth ・・・
Reposted from @blackstory1619  As the Civil War came to a close in 1865, a number of people remained enslaved, especially in remote areas. Word of slavery’s end traveled slowly, and for those who were largely isolated from Union armies, life continued as if freedom did not exist.
This was especially the case in Texas, where thousands of slaves were not made aware of freedom until June 19, 1865, when Union Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston and issued an order officially freeing them. Their celebration would serve as the basis of June 19 — or Juneteenth — a holiday celebrating emancipation in the US.
Ironically, while Juneteenth has become the most prominent Emancipation Day holiday in the US, it commemorates a smaller moment that remains relatively obscure. It doesn’t mark the signing of the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation, which technically freed slaves in the rebelling Confederate states, nor does it commemorate the December 1865 ratification of the 13th Amendment, which enshrined the end of slavery into the Constitution. Instead, it marks the moment when emancipation finally reached those in the deepest parts of the former Confederacy.
In many ways, Juneteenth represents how freedom and justice in the US has always been delayed for black people. The decades after the end of the war would see a wave of lynching, imprisonment, and Jim Crow laws take root. What followed was the disproportionate impact of mass incarceration, discriminatory housing policies, and a lack of economic investment. And now, as national attention remain focused on acts of police violence and various racial profiling incidents, it is clear that while progress has been made in black America’s 150 years out of bondage, considerable barriers continue to impede that progress... #juneteenth
    Thanks for the in depth history @jamsvy happy #juneteenth ・・・ Reposted from @blackstory1619 As the Civil War came to a close in 1865, a number of people remained enslaved, especially in remote areas. Word of slavery’s end traveled slowly, and for those who were largely isolated from Union armies, life continued as if freedom did not exist. This was especially the case in Texas, where thousands of slaves were not made aware of freedom until June 19, 1865, when Union Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston and issued an order officially freeing them. Their celebration would serve as the basis of June 19 — or Juneteenth — a holiday celebrating emancipation in the US. Ironically, while Juneteenth has become the most prominent Emancipation Day holiday in the US, it commemorates a smaller moment that remains relatively obscure. It doesn’t mark the signing of the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation, which technically freed slaves in the rebelling Confederate states, nor does it commemorate the December 1865 ratification of the 13th Amendment, which enshrined the end of slavery into the Constitution. Instead, it marks the moment when emancipation finally reached those in the deepest parts of the former Confederacy. In many ways, Juneteenth represents how freedom and justice in the US has always been delayed for black people. The decades after the end of the war would see a wave of lynching, imprisonment, and Jim Crow laws take root. What followed was the disproportionate impact of mass incarceration, discriminatory housing policies, and a lack of economic investment. And now, as national attention remain focused on acts of police violence and various racial profiling incidents, it is clear that while progress has been made in black America’s 150 years out of bondage, considerable barriers continue to impede that progress... #juneteenth
    #blacklivesmatter
    Me and my old friend @upstartcrow12 at Shakespeare’s tomb a few years ago. Happy birthday Will. 
PS fun fact: Wolfe’s handle “upstart crow” is based on an early critic of Shakespeare, who called his writing that of an “upstart crow” among other things. So... more evidence proving the old proverb “haters gonna hate.”
    Me and my old friend @upstartcrow12 at Shakespeare’s tomb a few years ago. Happy birthday Will. PS fun fact: Wolfe’s handle “upstart crow” is based on an early critic of Shakespeare, who called his writing that of an “upstart crow” among other things. So... more evidence proving the old proverb “haters gonna hate.”
    Woah that’s what I look like?
    Woah that’s what I look like?
    How do you say it better? Mark’s words:
・・・
So many of us are involved with charity during this pandemic. That’s commendable and beautiful and right. What the pandemic has also shown us is that our charity is only a bandaid on a cancerous economic system. If this system was economically just. If we had universal healthcare, living wages, childcare, racial justice, and guaranteed food and shelter, we wouldn’t have this mad scramble to raise funds for the people in need. We wouldn’t have this level of death and suffering in the richest nation in world.
We would be safe to weather out this storm more equally, together. Now, the inequality inherent in our economic system is laid bare. Brown people, and the poor, and working poor suffering the greatest losses. There is truly enough for all. But not when so much is hoarded by so few. The religious prophets we are honoring at this time knew this. They fought and died for it in one way or another. Let’s hope and pray there is a moral resurrection in this triple holy season brought on by the collapse and disruption of COVID-19. Funny that Jesus fought against an unjust empire. The virus itself is a crown. The virus is showing us how wrong we have it now morally, economically and spiritually. Happy Easter, Ramadan, and Passover to all.
    How do you say it better? Mark’s words: ・・・ So many of us are involved with charity during this pandemic. That’s commendable and beautiful and right. What the pandemic has also shown us is that our charity is only a bandaid on a cancerous economic system. If this system was economically just. If we had universal healthcare, living wages, childcare, racial justice, and guaranteed food and shelter, we wouldn’t have this mad scramble to raise funds for the people in need. We wouldn’t have this level of death and suffering in the richest nation in world. We would be safe to weather out this storm more equally, together. Now, the inequality inherent in our economic system is laid bare. Brown people, and the poor, and working poor suffering the greatest losses. There is truly enough for all. But not when so much is hoarded by so few. The religious prophets we are honoring at this time knew this. They fought and died for it in one way or another. Let’s hope and pray there is a moral resurrection in this triple holy season brought on by the collapse and disruption of COVID-19. Funny that Jesus fought against an unjust empire. The virus itself is a crown. The virus is showing us how wrong we have it now morally, economically and spiritually. Happy Easter, Ramadan, and Passover to all.
    I was in a sketch by my brilliantly funny friends @nickkocher and  @alexanfanger and dan Schimpf. It might be a welcome moment in your day. In any case it’s on @fxxnetwork on a cool show called Cake. Please don’t tell my agents that I did this. ・・・
    I was in a sketch by my brilliantly funny friends @nickkocher and @alexanfanger and dan Schimpf. It might be a welcome moment in your day. In any case it’s on @fxxnetwork on a cool show called Cake. Please don’t tell my agents that I did this. ・・・
    This is from a food bank location in LA, showing just how great the need is. On this strange St Patrick’s day, I am having some Irish medicine in my house and then donating to @lafoodbank to help out kids and other folks in need during these trying times. Feel free to share other local organizations near you; look out for each other, stay healthy and inside, and try to have a relatively happy St Pats. @lafoodbank #stpatscoronavirusday
    This is from a food bank location in LA, showing just how great the need is. On this strange St Patrick’s day, I am having some Irish medicine in my house and then donating to @lafoodbank to help out kids and other folks in need during these trying times. Feel free to share other local organizations near you; look out for each other, stay healthy and inside, and try to have a relatively happy St Pats. @lafoodbank #stpatscoronavirusday
    I voted. And I’m glowing. How about you?
    I voted. And I’m glowing. How about you?
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