Erik Carter
erik_carter

@ericfuckingandre for @vanityfair 

Interview: @ydesta 
Assist: @jgeigs
@ericfuckingandre for @vanityfair Interview: @ydesta Assist: @jgeigs
I've had the pleasure of knowing and photographing @mooredarnell for years, from coast to coast, and I remember each session distinctly. Every time we meet, I am grateful. I was thrilled to do so again for the newest project he's hosting and co-producing entitled, "Being Seen", a podcast that centers and celebrates Black queer and trans men and their contributions to the culture. Once more am I relieved to know this kind of work and celebration exists and is accessible in this world. I'll be tuning in for every episode. I invite you to do the same.
I've had the pleasure of knowing and photographing @mooredarnell for years, from coast to coast, and I remember each session distinctly. Every time we meet, I am grateful. I was thrilled to do so again for the newest project he's hosting and co-producing entitled, "Being Seen", a podcast that centers and celebrates Black queer and trans men and their contributions to the culture. Once more am I relieved to know this kind of work and celebration exists and is accessible in this world. I'll be tuning in for every episode. I invite you to do the same.
In the thick of all the noise and chaos, I sometimes forget to stop and remind myself of what I can be grateful for. To be even slightly aware of what's happening everyday makes this act difficult. However, today and everyday, I'm grateful for the force that is @janayathefuture, and their constant leadership and intimate devotion to our fight for justice. I'm grateful for the opportunity to photograph them in this moment for @highsnobiety. I'm grateful for the remarkable work from stylist @coreytstokes, hair @vernonfrancois, make-up @robrumseymua, and for the friendship and assistance of @nicolbiesekphoto.

Familiarize yourself with Janaya's words. You can do so by starting with the interview from this feature, where they spoke with @c.syresmith. Here's a portion:

"So our job, in this time of the great battle of beliefs, is to figure out who we are and who we want to be. It's a reminder that it is not yet too late to be the person you always thought that you could be. There's risk in fighting for justice, but you learn something. The risk of losing myself by doing nothing is greater to me than the risk of anything that I can experience out there — any kind of bigotry, or any kind of hatred. The risk of losing myself is greater than the risk that they represent to me, and to all of us. Because we lose a part of ourselves if we disappear into a system that we know we don't believe in."
In the thick of all the noise and chaos, I sometimes forget to stop and remind myself of what I can be grateful for. To be even slightly aware of what's happening everyday makes this act difficult. However, today and everyday, I'm grateful for the force that is @janayathefuture, and their constant leadership and intimate devotion to our fight for justice. I'm grateful for the opportunity to photograph them in this moment for @highsnobiety. I'm grateful for the remarkable work from stylist @coreytstokes, hair @vernonfrancois, make-up @robrumseymua, and for the friendship and assistance of @nicolbiesekphoto. Familiarize yourself with Janaya's words. You can do so by starting with the interview from this feature, where they spoke with @c.syresmith. Here's a portion:

"So our job, in this time of the great battle of beliefs, is to figure out who we are and who we want to be. It's a reminder that it is not yet too late to be the person you always thought that you could be. There's risk in fighting for justice, but you learn something. The risk of losing myself by doing nothing is greater to me than the risk of anything that I can experience out there — any kind of bigotry, or any kind of hatred. The risk of losing myself is greater than the risk that they represent to me, and to all of us. Because we lose a part of ourselves if we disappear into a system that we know we don't believe in."
@janellemonae for @guardianweekend. I've always been so moved by their artistry and grateful for their voice, in every possible way. I'm happy to have had this opportunity. 

Stylist: @mandelkorn 
Hair: @nikkinelms 
Make-up: @jessicasmalls 
Photo team: @tronqs @dallaswing 

Thank you to @kateedwa and @huntforcaroline
@janellemonae for @guardianweekend. I've always been so moved by their artistry and grateful for their voice, in every possible way. I'm happy to have had this opportunity. Stylist: @mandelkorn Hair: @nikkinelms Make-up: @jessicasmalls Photo team: @tronqs @dallaswing Thank you to @kateedwa and @huntforcaroline
A quick and graceful moment with @iamreginaking, one of the absolute greats for @people. A real one and someone I’ve admired for as long as I can remember. I’m so excited for her upcoming directorial debut, “One Night In Miami”, and everything else she gives us. 

Styling - @waymanandmicah 
Makeup - @makeupbylatrice 
Hair - @larryjarahsims 
Assistant - @listenfortheninja
A quick and graceful moment with @iamreginaking, one of the absolute greats for @people. A real one and someone I’ve admired for as long as I can remember. I’m so excited for her upcoming directorial debut, “One Night In Miami”, and everything else she gives us. Styling - @waymanandmicah Makeup - @makeupbylatrice Hair - @larryjarahsims Assistant - @listenfortheninja
James Fugate, co-owner of Eso Won Books in LA for @nytimes’ Labor Day story about workers during the pandemic. I’ve spent quite a lot of time in many different bookstores, both as a customer and employee, and Eso Won is certainly a favorite. I wish every city had a similar store, wall to wall with Black literature of all kinds, and I wish every store had someone like James. Watching James, who had been up since 6 am, restock the shelves of a store that has been in the community for three decades reminded me of the time I entered a bookstore as a young person, sat on the floor, and started reading Toni Morrison for the first time. The word essential doesn’t even begin to describe it.
James Fugate, co-owner of Eso Won Books in LA for @nytimes’ Labor Day story about workers during the pandemic. I’ve spent quite a lot of time in many different bookstores, both as a customer and employee, and Eso Won is certainly a favorite. I wish every city had a similar store, wall to wall with Black literature of all kinds, and I wish every store had someone like James. Watching James, who had been up since 6 am, restock the shelves of a store that has been in the community for three decades reminded me of the time I entered a bookstore as a young person, sat on the floor, and started reading Toni Morrison for the first time. The word essential doesn’t even begin to describe it.
I met Bennett a couple of years back during my first visit to LA. We met at his local CrossFit, where we discussed a range of topics while I captured him doing some movements around the gym, all the while admiring his strength and intelligence. Now here he is, 30 weeks pregnant, exhibiting that same strength. Thank you for allowing me to capture this moment in your life. What a beautiful home for a child to be born into.
I met Bennett a couple of years back during my first visit to LA. We met at his local CrossFit, where we discussed a range of topics while I captured him doing some movements around the gym, all the while admiring his strength and intelligence. Now here he is, 30 weeks pregnant, exhibiting that same strength. Thank you for allowing me to capture this moment in your life. What a beautiful home for a child to be born into.
Moments like this will stay with me for very long time. There's quite a lot to say regarding this moment and the power of these three women, so I'll just say thank you. Thank you @opalayo @osopepatrisse @chasinggarza @blklivesmatter, recipients of this year's Beacon award and cover story for @adweek @adcolor.
Moments like this will stay with me for very long time. There's quite a lot to say regarding this moment and the power of these three women, so I'll just say thank you. Thank you @opalayo @osopepatrisse @chasinggarza @blklivesmatter, recipients of this year's Beacon award and cover story for @adweek @adcolor.
A true honor to photograph @opalayo in the Arizona desert for this important September issue of @vanityfair. In addition to the never-ending work that must be done, I implore all to read the issue and familiarize themself with the voices and artists on display. Thank you to @cmarinai for this opportunity.
A true honor to photograph @opalayo in the Arizona desert for this important September issue of @vanityfair. In addition to the never-ending work that must be done, I implore all to read the issue and familiarize themself with the voices and artists on display. Thank you to @cmarinai for this opportunity.
Thankful to once again capture the beauty and joy of @issarae, this time for the cover of @hollywoodreporter. Congratulations on this recent much deserved recognition. In your immortal words, “I’m rooting for everybody Black”.

Styling: @jasonrembert @jareddepriest @shameelahhicks 
Hair: @lovingyourhair 
Makeup: @joannasimkin 
Story: @somekindofemme 
Team: @nicolbiesekphoto 

Thank you to @katepappa and @jenlaskiphotovideo
Thankful to once again capture the beauty and joy of @issarae, this time for the cover of @hollywoodreporter. Congratulations on this recent much deserved recognition. In your immortal words, “I’m rooting for everybody Black”. Styling: @jasonrembert @jareddepriest @shameelahhicks Hair: @lovingyourhair Makeup: @joannasimkin Story: @somekindofemme Team: @nicolbiesekphoto Thank you to @katepappa and @jenlaskiphotovideo
I've been thinking a lot about the many definitions of legacy and what we are able to gift to those who we cherish as friends and family. The word primarily has ties to property and assets but for me, it mostly embodies the intangible things we receive and the wisdom we're granted. What will a person or a generation leave behind and what will a family choose to hold on to? Over the last few months, I've been very apprehensive about personal work. All at once, almost everything I wanted to touch on seemed too sacred, too precious to even begin to dissect. I came to realize these figures and stories, particularly stories about all Black queer folk, are undoubtedly precious and therefore must be explored. Through the breath and actions of others, our legacies can exist, and all I can do in the meantime is seek to create an exhaustive archive of us.
I've been thinking a lot about the many definitions of legacy and what we are able to gift to those who we cherish as friends and family. The word primarily has ties to property and assets but for me, it mostly embodies the intangible things we receive and the wisdom we're granted. What will a person or a generation leave behind and what will a family choose to hold on to? Over the last few months, I've been very apprehensive about personal work. All at once, almost everything I wanted to touch on seemed too sacred, too precious to even begin to dissect. I came to realize these figures and stories, particularly stories about all Black queer folk, are undoubtedly precious and therefore must be explored. Through the breath and actions of others, our legacies can exist, and all I can do in the meantime is seek to create an exhaustive archive of us.
@victoriamonet for PAPER

Assist: @nicolbiesekphoto 
Styling: @morgann 
Makeup: @grace_pae 
Hair: @kahhspence 
Interview: @biancag16
@victoriamonet for PAPER Assist: @nicolbiesekphoto Styling: @morgann Makeup: @grace_pae Hair: @kahhspence Interview: @biancag16
Marc Maron for @nytimes, from last weekends interview discussing the passing of his partner, filmmaker Lynn Shelton. Thank you @jolieruben for trusting me to capture such a delicate moment. Check out the interview if you can, particularly the very last answer.
Marc Maron for @nytimes, from last weekends interview discussing the passing of his partner, filmmaker Lynn Shelton. Thank you @jolieruben for trusting me to capture such a delicate moment. Check out the interview if you can, particularly the very last answer.
Grateful to spend some time with @nonamehiding for @nytimes. Story by @iman.stevenson, where they discuss the importance and impact of Black Book Clubs, like @nonamereads. Thank you @marysaleah
Grateful to spend some time with @nonamehiding for @nytimes. Story by @iman.stevenson, where they discuss the importance and impact of Black Book Clubs, like @nonamereads. Thank you @marysaleah
I find my body and spirit to be a little absent recently, since most days I don't feel like engaging with many parts of this world (though the fight rages on). Fortunately, I was able to dash those feelings and spend a little time with Flo while she was in town. Though we'd never met, I've admired her work for some time and I've also admired her joy. I specifically remember watching her reaction to seeing her exquisite story about young girls of color figure skating in Harlem be featured in The New York Times. That kind of delight and pride, especially when the connection to the work is so deep, is something I revere and constantly look for. Thank you, Flo, for sharing your time, energy, and laughter with me, and your gift with us all.
I find my body and spirit to be a little absent recently, since most days I don't feel like engaging with many parts of this world (though the fight rages on). Fortunately, I was able to dash those feelings and spend a little time with Flo while she was in town. Though we'd never met, I've admired her work for some time and I've also admired her joy. I specifically remember watching her reaction to seeing her exquisite story about young girls of color figure skating in Harlem be featured in The New York Times. That kind of delight and pride, especially when the connection to the work is so deep, is something I revere and constantly look for. Thank you, Flo, for sharing your time, energy, and laughter with me, and your gift with us all.
What an incredible gathering of Black artists and thinkers in this mornings New York Times feature, 'Sources of Self-Regard: Self-Portraits from Black Photographers Reflecting on America'. I'm so honored to be in their company. Thank you to @jolieruben, @amandalwebster, @mloo and the whole team for their work, and thank you @debwillisphoto for your words. It's not often we are given the opportunity to provide some artistic insight into how we navigate and see this world, rather than how it sees us.

Here are some of my words for the piece: "As an artist who is black and queer, photography grants me the power to confront villains and explore the depths of my mental health. When that examination is focused on the world around me, and on those I love and want to celebrate, that’s when I’m able to find a way out."
What an incredible gathering of Black artists and thinkers in this mornings New York Times feature, 'Sources of Self-Regard: Self-Portraits from Black Photographers Reflecting on America'. I'm so honored to be in their company. Thank you to @jolieruben, @amandalwebster, @mloo and the whole team for their work, and thank you @debwillisphoto for your words. It's not often we are given the opportunity to provide some artistic insight into how we navigate and see this world, rather than how it sees us. Here are some of my words for the piece: "As an artist who is black and queer, photography grants me the power to confront villains and explore the depths of my mental health. When that examination is focused on the world around me, and on those I love and want to celebrate, that’s when I’m able to find a way out."
We truly are wonders. The strength it takes for black people to move through this world in the midst of all the trauma, brutal imagery, and newfound posturing is endless. We fight and relinquish our responsibility to educate white folks on the vast forms of privilege and bias, from undisguised racism and violence to the thin forms that have forever fanned against us like a hot breeze. As we’ve come into this month they call Pride, I think heavily about the black queer and trans community, and am once again reminded of that strength. Somewhere in the midst of all of this, in the face of all the violence, pain, and drought of power, we find the energy to hold ourselves and each other. Wonders, we are. // Keiynan, seen here, granting me time and spirit. Thank you.
We truly are wonders. The strength it takes for black people to move through this world in the midst of all the trauma, brutal imagery, and newfound posturing is endless. We fight and relinquish our responsibility to educate white folks on the vast forms of privilege and bias, from undisguised racism and violence to the thin forms that have forever fanned against us like a hot breeze. As we’ve come into this month they call Pride, I think heavily about the black queer and trans community, and am once again reminded of that strength. Somewhere in the midst of all of this, in the face of all the violence, pain, and drought of power, we find the energy to hold ourselves and each other. Wonders, we are. // Keiynan, seen here, granting me time and spirit. Thank you.
I go back and forth from tears and numbness to sporadic bursts of energy and rage, the former always outlasting the latter. I'm flooded with memories of racist confrontations and violent flashes of murder on television and in photos, knowing that I grew up with more imagery of tortured black bodies than of celebrated ones. It's in this space that I feel lost and hopeless… Baldwin said artists are here to disturb the peace, so I think of ways to disturb, to disrupt this place with something creative, but I cry once again and feel numb. Somewhere in between the grief and the rage, I make the time to act, to contribute somehow until those emotions have their way once more. I know it will take some time. It always does… I took this photo a few years ago. These are my nephews. They are perfect. Two black bodies, asleep, lovingly resting on each other, forever holding each other up. Perfect. They have a beautiful mother who is smart, compassionate, resilient, and is endlessly celebrating their life... This is the image I focus on. These are the black bodies I will show my children. This is what will help me disturb the peace.
I go back and forth from tears and numbness to sporadic bursts of energy and rage, the former always outlasting the latter. I'm flooded with memories of racist confrontations and violent flashes of murder on television and in photos, knowing that I grew up with more imagery of tortured black bodies than of celebrated ones. It's in this space that I feel lost and hopeless… Baldwin said artists are here to disturb the peace, so I think of ways to disturb, to disrupt this place with something creative, but I cry once again and feel numb. Somewhere in between the grief and the rage, I make the time to act, to contribute somehow until those emotions have their way once more. I know it will take some time. It always does… I took this photo a few years ago. These are my nephews. They are perfect. Two black bodies, asleep, lovingly resting on each other, forever holding each other up. Perfect. They have a beautiful mother who is smart, compassionate, resilient, and is endlessly celebrating their life... This is the image I focus on. These are the black bodies I will show my children. This is what will help me disturb the peace.
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