Austin Siadak (@austin_siadak) instagram网页版-veryins.com
Austin Siadak
austin_siadak
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@alexhonnold soaks in a technicolor sunset from the summit of El Cap a few weeks back. We spent a lot of time on the summit this season, often camping for days at a time in order to rappel in and work on pitches. A lot of other climbers were up there too, and while it is great to see so many people enjoying the incredible adventure the Big Stone provides, it’s important to recognize that the summit is a fragile sub-alpine environment that needs to be cared for properly. Below is a specific list of rules to follow, direct from the Yosemite Climbing Rangers, that will allow you to avoid any fines and be a caring steward of this amazing natural resource.

1) Obtain a permit if you plan to camp on top. These permits are free from the Valley Visitor’s Center.

2) Please refrain from having fires on the summit. There is hardly any wood up there that is naturally dead and down, and what remains is needed to help replenish and regenerate the soil.

3) Label and date any gear caches with your name and contact info. Take any caches with you when you leave the park for the season. Climbers already receive special treatment here, as caches are normally not allowed for more than 24hrs. If you are actively working on a route and not leaving the park, labeled caches are OK.

4) Store any food in a bear canister or hanging over the face. Keep food secure, as ravens can easily open many bags left unattended.

Beyond those specifics rules, please follow general Leave No Trace principles. Take out any trash you bring or create. Bury your poo in a hole or use a wag bag, and pack out toilet paper. Only camp in existing bivy sites. These are really common sense things, and if we all manage to follow them it will greatly help protect the resource and access for generations to come 🙏
#searchingforgalen
@alexhonnold soaks in a technicolor sunset from the summit of El Cap a few weeks back. We spent a lot of time on the summit this season, often camping for days at a time in order to rappel in and work on pitches. A lot of other climbers were up there too, and while it is great to see so many people enjoying the incredible adventure the Big Stone provides, it’s important to recognize that the summit is a fragile sub-alpine environment that needs to be cared for properly. Below is a specific list of rules to follow, direct from the Yosemite Climbing Rangers, that will allow you to avoid any fines and be a caring steward of this amazing natural resource. 1) Obtain a permit if you plan to camp on top. These permits are free from the Valley Visitor’s Center. 2) Please refrain from having fires on the summit. There is hardly any wood up there that is naturally dead and down, and what remains is needed to help replenish and regenerate the soil. 3) Label and date any gear caches with your name and contact info. Take any caches with you when you leave the park for the season. Climbers already receive special treatment here, as caches are normally not allowed for more than 24hrs. If you are actively working on a route and not leaving the park, labeled caches are OK. 4) Store any food in a bear canister or hanging over the face. Keep food secure, as ravens can easily open many bags left unattended. Beyond those specifics rules, please follow general Leave No Trace principles. Take out any trash you bring or create. Bury your poo in a hole or use a wag bag, and pack out toilet paper. Only camp in existing bivy sites. These are really common sense things, and if we all manage to follow them it will greatly help protect the resource and access for generations to come 🙏 #searchingforgalen
Master multi-tasker @tommycaldwell demonstrating the latest in hands-free technology up on El Cap 🤗 It was pretty funny watching him try to take conference calls from the summit, struggling to rack up with one hand and also deal with the increased responsibilities and work that celebrity has brought into his life. But then I saw his face light up as he reached for his headlamp, fiddled for a moment, and made it all work. Just another day in the office.

Honestly though, this is in a nutshell what makes Tommy so good at what he does - when confronted with unexpected problems he quickly comes up with simple DIY solutions and keeps forging onward, while most others (including myself) would probably be scratching their heads wondering what to do.
Master multi-tasker @tommycaldwell demonstrating the latest in hands-free technology up on El Cap 🤗 It was pretty funny watching him try to take conference calls from the summit, struggling to rack up with one hand and also deal with the increased responsibilities and work that celebrity has brought into his life. But then I saw his face light up as he reached for his headlamp, fiddled for a moment, and made it all work. Just another day in the office. Honestly though, this is in a nutshell what makes Tommy so good at what he does - when confronted with unexpected problems he quickly comes up with simple DIY solutions and keeps forging onward, while most others (including myself) would probably be scratching their heads wondering what to do.
Looking forward to the magic light and lines of winter.
Looking forward to the magic light and lines of winter.
Over most of the last month I was fortunate to tag along as @tommycaldwell @alexhonnold and @kjorgeson attempted to unlock and climb a new free route on El Capitan. From Oct. 28-31, I joined Alex and Tommy on their send push - a “Hail Mary” as they called it, given that they still didn’t have the hard pitches dialed, and there were many sequences that remained unclimbed and full of question marks. (Kevin was unable to join as he stayed with his family in Santa Rosa during a spell of wildfires in the area). A bit to everyone’s surprise, Tommy and Alex managed to free the route, thought not without quite the fight. They fell repeatedly at the cruxes, Tommy’s fingers oozed with more and more blood each day, and Alex seriously considered throwing in the towel only halfway up the wall. Thankfully he didn’t, and he even ended up leading most of the final hard block to the summit. Respect. We topped out just after sunset, but spent only a few minutes on top before sprinting down the East Ledges to deliver Tommy to his waiting family. It was, after all, Halloween, and with throbbing hands and aching feet TC pulled on his Jedi costume and headed back out into the night to Trick or Treat with his kids. Alex and I took the opportunity to take hot showers and eat dinner instead 🤷🏻‍♂️. Thanks guys for your friendship and trusting me to hang out up there. An unforgettable adventure. Many more photos and stories to come...
Over most of the last month I was fortunate to tag along as @tommycaldwell @alexhonnold and @kjorgeson attempted to unlock and climb a new free route on El Capitan. From Oct. 28-31, I joined Alex and Tommy on their send push - a “Hail Mary” as they called it, given that they still didn’t have the hard pitches dialed, and there were many sequences that remained unclimbed and full of question marks. (Kevin was unable to join as he stayed with his family in Santa Rosa during a spell of wildfires in the area). A bit to everyone’s surprise, Tommy and Alex managed to free the route, thought not without quite the fight. They fell repeatedly at the cruxes, Tommy’s fingers oozed with more and more blood each day, and Alex seriously considered throwing in the towel only halfway up the wall. Thankfully he didn’t, and he even ended up leading most of the final hard block to the summit. Respect. We topped out just after sunset, but spent only a few minutes on top before sprinting down the East Ledges to deliver Tommy to his waiting family. It was, after all, Halloween, and with throbbing hands and aching feet TC pulled on his Jedi costume and headed back out into the night to Trick or Treat with his kids. Alex and I took the opportunity to take hot showers and eat dinner instead 🤷🏻‍♂️. Thanks guys for your friendship and trusting me to hang out up there. An unforgettable adventure. Many more photos and stories to come...
When “rolling out of bed” has a bit more consequence.
When “rolling out of bed” has a bit more consequence.
Oh hiiiiii👋
@alexhonnold @tommycaldwell
Oh hiiiiii👋 @alexhonnold @tommycaldwell
Moments between.
Moments between.
Currently en route to Boulder to premiere this labor of love at @reelrock. Can’t wait to see the final cut in front of a big crowd, along with all the other stellar films in this year’s lineup. Come on out tonight or tomorrow if you’re in town, and check the Reel Rock website for showings all around the country beginning next week.

As part of this weekend’s festivities I’ll be teaching a clinic on bigwall photography at Movement in Boulder on Saturday afternoon. If you’ve ever wondered how we get the shots that end up in these films I’ll be passing along some crucial lessons learned through trial (and a lot of) error :) Finally, a massive shoutout to @joshlowell who has been editing around the clock to put the finishing touches on this film. It’s going to be a great one, due mostly to his deft eye and sharp skills.

Oh, and who wants to get a Flatty lap in?!?!
Currently en route to Boulder to premiere this labor of love at @reelrock. Can’t wait to see the final cut in front of a big crowd, along with all the other stellar films in this year’s lineup. Come on out tonight or tomorrow if you’re in town, and check the Reel Rock website for showings all around the country beginning next week. As part of this weekend’s festivities I’ll be teaching a clinic on bigwall photography at Movement in Boulder on Saturday afternoon. If you’ve ever wondered how we get the shots that end up in these films I’ll be passing along some crucial lessons learned through trial (and a lot of) error :) Finally, a massive shoutout to @joshlowell who has been editing around the clock to put the finishing touches on this film. It’s going to be a great one, due mostly to his deft eye and sharp skills. Oh, and who wants to get a Flatty lap in?!?!
It’s been good to be back in Yosemite the last few days; swinging around high on El Cap never loses its electrifying, gut-churning energy. Though smoke from the Briceburg Fire has been a bit grim at times, it sure has made for some colorful skies.
It’s been good to be back in Yosemite the last few days; swinging around high on El Cap never loses its electrifying, gut-churning energy. Though smoke from the Briceburg Fire has been a bit grim at times, it sure has made for some colorful skies.
Jane Sievert. Friend, mentor, mother, sister, force. As longtime former Director of Photography at @patagonia, Jane has had a stronger impact on the visual content and character of the outdoor industry (and thus many of the images you scroll through on this app) than just about anyone. And she’s played an instrumental role in the careers of many of the industry’s biggest names, @jimmychin @chrisburkard @mikeylikesrocks @ben_moon @coreyrichproductions @coryrichards just to name a few off the top of my head.

I caught up with Jane this past weekend at her beautiful home, nestled against a grove of towering California redwoods, and talked about life, death, love, and what makes for great imagery.
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“You know I hate to use the word ‘authentic’ these days, Austin, but that’s what it comes down to. No bullshit. If it is real it is beautiful.”
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Like that of many of the photographers she’s helped and mentored over the years, Jane’s success has come not because she studied photography or creative design in a stuffy classroom somewhere, but because she was a core climber and skier first, and her keen eye developed through the daily experience of walking the walk.
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“I left Wisconsin in 1980 for Evergreen [State College], and I was always getting into trouble. Spring break my freshman year a group of us drove down to Joshua Tree, and I just never went back! A while later I was waitressing in Mammoth, skiing almost every day, when Yvon and Melinda Chouinard came in and sat at one of my tables. We got to talking that night, and then they came in again the next night too. They told me about this small company they had going down in Ventura, and that if I ever wanted a job I should come check it out. I started out working in the Ventura store, and then ran events, but I was terrible at sales and even worse at public speaking! One day I got a call from Jennifer Ridgeway [original photo director] and she said ‘I’m starting a photo department and I’d like you to come work with me.’ Apparently she saw my bio in the company directory and figured my climbing and skiing experience would be useful for picking out the kind of unique and authentic photos she wanted.” Turns out, it was.
Jane Sievert. Friend, mentor, mother, sister, force. As longtime former Director of Photography at @patagonia, Jane has had a stronger impact on the visual content and character of the outdoor industry (and thus many of the images you scroll through on this app) than just about anyone. And she’s played an instrumental role in the careers of many of the industry’s biggest names, @jimmychin @chrisburkard @mikeylikesrocks @ben_moon @coreyrichproductions @coryrichards just to name a few off the top of my head. I caught up with Jane this past weekend at her beautiful home, nestled against a grove of towering California redwoods, and talked about life, death, love, and what makes for great imagery. . “You know I hate to use the word ‘authentic’ these days, Austin, but that’s what it comes down to. No bullshit. If it is real it is beautiful.” . Like that of many of the photographers she’s helped and mentored over the years, Jane’s success has come not because she studied photography or creative design in a stuffy classroom somewhere, but because she was a core climber and skier first, and her keen eye developed through the daily experience of walking the walk. . “I left Wisconsin in 1980 for Evergreen [State College], and I was always getting into trouble. Spring break my freshman year a group of us drove down to Joshua Tree, and I just never went back! A while later I was waitressing in Mammoth, skiing almost every day, when Yvon and Melinda Chouinard came in and sat at one of my tables. We got to talking that night, and then they came in again the next night too. They told me about this small company they had going down in Ventura, and that if I ever wanted a job I should come check it out. I started out working in the Ventura store, and then ran events, but I was terrible at sales and even worse at public speaking! One day I got a call from Jennifer Ridgeway [original photo director] and she said ‘I’m starting a photo department and I’d like you to come work with me.’ Apparently she saw my bio in the company directory and figured my climbing and skiing experience would be useful for picking out the kind of unique and authentic photos she wanted.” Turns out, it was.
We were mostly blessed with perfect weather on the Green, but we also had the fortune to experience this wild stormcell that sent whitecaps crashing into the bows of our canoes, filled the sky with flashes of lightning and thunder, and painted the clouds overhead a disturbingly beautiful hue. My best guess is that it was caused by the light of the red desert reflecting back up into the storm, but at the time I was hellbent on finding a suitable campsite before we got sucked into another dimension.
We were mostly blessed with perfect weather on the Green, but we also had the fortune to experience this wild stormcell that sent whitecaps crashing into the bows of our canoes, filled the sky with flashes of lightning and thunder, and painted the clouds overhead a disturbingly beautiful hue. My best guess is that it was caused by the light of the red desert reflecting back up into the storm, but at the time I was hellbent on finding a suitable campsite before we got sucked into another dimension.
A few snapshots from an unforgettable week floating down a river of light, laughter, and more cracks than you could climb in a lifetime. Grab some friends and go. You’ll see...
@chrismutzel 
@jimmyvoorhis 
@eliza_earle 
@outdoor.jake 
@lindsaycaitlin
A few snapshots from an unforgettable week floating down a river of light, laughter, and more cracks than you could climb in a lifetime. Grab some friends and go. You’ll see... @chrismutzel @jimmyvoorhis @eliza_earle @outdoor.jake @lindsaycaitlin
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