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Amnesty International Stories of activism, change and how people around the world are making a difference. And how you can, too.

Torture has been outlawed, but the equipment needs to be too. Read our link in bio for more.
Torture has been outlawed, but the equipment needs to be too. Read our link in bio for more.
More than 60 years after torture was outlawed internationally, gruesome torture equipment is still being openly marketed and traded around the world. Read our link in bio for why it needs to be banned.
More than 60 years after torture was outlawed internationally, gruesome torture equipment is still being openly marketed and traded around the world. Read our link in bio for why it needs to be banned.
Torture has been outlawed, so why do these items still exist? Read our link in bio for why torture equipment needs to be banned.
Torture has been outlawed, so why do these items still exist? Read our link in bio for why torture equipment needs to be banned.
A protestor in Thailand stands with a picture of Marielle Franco. Marielle Franco was born and raised in a favela in Rio, Brazil. As an elected councillor, she worked tirelessly to promote the rights of black women, LGBTI and young people, speaking out about police killings and injustice. On 14 March, a car pulled up beside hers, and Marielle was shot four times in the head. Her death has become symbolic of inherent racism against black women and prejudice against LGBTI people in Brazil. Protestors around the world have lobbied for an investigation into who ordered her death.
A protestor in Thailand stands with a picture of Marielle Franco. Marielle Franco was born and raised in a favela in Rio, Brazil. As an elected councillor, she worked tirelessly to promote the rights of black women, LGBTI and young people, speaking out about police killings and injustice. On 14 March, a car pulled up beside hers, and Marielle was shot four times in the head. Her death has become symbolic of inherent racism against black women and prejudice against LGBTI people in Brazil. Protestors around the world have lobbied for an investigation into who ordered her death.
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© Amnesty International / Henning Schacht
💪💪💪💪💪💪 © Amnesty International / Henning Schacht
Earlier this year, human rights activist Nasrin Sotoudeh was jailed for her work opposing the forced hijab laws in Iran. Nasrin was sentenced to an outrageous 38 and a half year prison term and 148 lashes; the harshest ever punishment for a human rights defender in recent years. Nasrin had dedicated her life to defending women’s rights and speaking out against the death penalty. In solidarity, people protested around the world, calling for her release. © Adolfo Lujan
Earlier this year, human rights activist Nasrin Sotoudeh was jailed for her work opposing the forced hijab laws in Iran. Nasrin was sentenced to an outrageous 38 and a half year prison term and 148 lashes; the harshest ever punishment for a human rights defender in recent years. Nasrin had dedicated her life to defending women’s rights and speaking out against the death penalty. In solidarity, people protested around the world, calling for her release. © Adolfo Lujan
This is what a policing failure looks like. 👨‍✈️🤦‍♂️
This is what a policing failure looks like. 👨‍✈️🤦‍♂️
Sudan, we’re thinking of you. An internet ban can’t keep our solidarity out.
Sudan, we’re thinking of you. An internet ban can’t keep our solidarity out.
Last week, Norway tried to deport Taibeh, her mother and her siblings to Afghanistan—a country they had never been to before. Here is how their community in Trondheim responded when they were finally sent back home. ❤️Because home is where the heart is ❤️
Last week, Norway tried to deport Taibeh, her mother and her siblings to Afghanistan—a country they had never been to before. Here is how their community in Trondheim responded when they were finally sent back home. ❤️Because home is where the heart is ❤️
There are 25.9 million people worldwide seeking safety—fleeing violence, persecution and uncertainty. Many of them, are hosted in developing countries, like Lebanon and Jordan. We must increase the number of people who can start their lives in a safe country. Follow our stories, to see how community sponsorship works.
There are 25.9 million people worldwide seeking safety—fleeing violence, persecution and uncertainty. Many of them, are hosted in developing countries, like Lebanon and Jordan. We must increase the number of people who can start their lives in a safe country. Follow our stories, to see how community sponsorship works.
Happy World Refugee Day! Looking for some information for the next time you need to talk to someone about refugees? Take a look at our video on YouTube with @malirania as she debunks some of the myths around people seeking safety. Link in bio.
Happy World Refugee Day! Looking for some information for the next time you need to talk to someone about refugees? Take a look at our video on YouTube with @malirania as she debunks some of the myths around people seeking safety. Link in bio.
Aye Hman, 68, lost her son Kyaw Aung, 38, when he was beaten to death by Myanmar soldiers in late June 2017. The soldiers had descended on the village following recent fighting with an ethnic armed group and detained several hundred villagers at the local monastery, interrogating many of them about alleged links to the armed group. Kyaw Aung, had a developmental disorder that his mother said, made it difficult for him to respond to questions, which resulted in his killing. "My son has a disability. He can’t reply well to questions. They were asking if anyone was a soldier, and my son, he didn’t know how to respond. They also saw a scar on his face, from when he had fallen down. [From the scar], they suspected he was a soldier… They arrested him and beat him. They struck him over and over, with their fists, their boots, and the wood." Kyaw Aung’s body was later found between Man Lan and a neighbouring village. © Minzayar Oo - Panos / Amnesty International
Aye Hman, 68, lost her son Kyaw Aung, 38, when he was beaten to death by Myanmar soldiers in late June 2017. The soldiers had descended on the village following recent fighting with an ethnic armed group and detained several hundred villagers at the local monastery, interrogating many of them about alleged links to the armed group. Kyaw Aung, had a developmental disorder that his mother said, made it difficult for him to respond to questions, which resulted in his killing. "My son has a disability. He can’t reply well to questions. They were asking if anyone was a soldier, and my son, he didn’t know how to respond. They also saw a scar on his face, from when he had fallen down. [From the scar], they suspected he was a soldier… They arrested him and beat him. They struck him over and over, with their fists, their boots, and the wood." Kyaw Aung’s body was later found between Man Lan and a neighbouring village. © Minzayar Oo - Panos / Amnesty International